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Author Topic:   Wristwatches worn on EVA (spacewalks)
Philip
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From: Brussels, Belgium
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posted 01-26-2022 03:14 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Philip   Click Here to Email Philip     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
So far six wristwatch makes have been directly exposed to the harsh outer space environment:
  • 1965, June 03 Omega Speedmaster 105.003-63 (Gemini IV - Ed White)
  • 1966, Sept 13 Glycine Airman automatic (Gemini XI - Charles Conrad)
  • 1971, Aug 02 Bulova 88510 chronograph (Apollo 15 - David Scott)
  • 1994, Sept 09 Fortis Official Cosmonauts (Mir-16 - Yuri Malenchenko)
  • 2008, Sept 27 Fiyta chronograph (Shenzhou 7 - Zhai Zhigang)
  • 2008, Dec 23 Seiko Spacewalk Springdrive (ISS Exp 18 – Yuri Lonchakov)
  • 2022, Jan 19 Panerai Radiomir or Vostok (ISS Exp 66 – Anton Shkaplerov)
During the Jan. 19, 2022 spacewalk, we added the seventh brand to the list. The discussion goes on here if it was an Italian Panerai or Russian Vostok wristwatch.

Liembo
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From: Bothell, WA
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posted 01-26-2022 12:41 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Liembo   Click Here to Email Liembo     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Here's a good photo of the bezel:

Philip
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From: Brussels, Belgium
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posted 02-04-2022 12:31 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Philip   Click Here to Email Philip     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
45 mm Panerai RadioMir PAM210, from Wrist Enthusiast:
During the 7-hour International Space Station walk feed from NASA, journalists saw something interesting and started passing around information trying to verify it. On the wrist of Russian Astronaut Anton Shkaplerov was a different kind of “Space Watch” - A Panerai.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 02-04-2022 03:31 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
From Panerai (via Instagram):
Further to the recent reveals of journalists and after serious check of the information, we are proud to confirm that the NASA has embarked a Panerai watch in the International Space Station.

The mission is still ongoing as it is organized from Oct 17th, 2021 up to March 28th, 2022.

As it has been covered by a 7 hours broadcast from the official stream of NASA TV on the 19 January 2022 at 6am, Russian Commander Anton Shkaplerov was wearing a Radiomir 45mm PAM210. The watch has been associated moreover to a mission as part of an Extra Vehicular Activity in the space.

The external temperature of an EVA goes from +121 degrees when exposed to the sun to -157 degrees when the astronaut is in the shadow.

If our timepieces have been tested since many years and in many occasions in the depth of various oceans, it is the very first time we have one of our watch in the space.

We are glad that one of our timepiece has been selected for this activity.

You will find below some pictures selected from the 7 hours of broadcasting.

The citation of NASA here is either mistaken or being used generically, as the flight of the Panerai appears to have had nothing to do with the U.S. space agency.

Philip
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From: Brussels, Belgium
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posted 02-05-2022 03:02 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Philip   Click Here to Email Philip     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Currently an eighth wristwatch make was spotted during the September 3 spacewalk, worn by the cosmonaut in the red-striped Orlan space suit, Oleg Novitsky.

Probably a Russian make, we're working on the identification...

Mariner1824
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posted 02-07-2022 03:56 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Mariner1824     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Others more learned may correct me if I’m wrong; but I understood it is now generally accepted that Ed Mitchell wore his personal Rolex GMT Master on his lunar surface EVAs during Apollo 14, in preference to his issue Speedmaster.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 02-07-2022 10:26 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Mitchell wore his NASA-issued Omega Speedmaster on a Velcro strap on the outside of his spacesuit. He may have worn his Rolex under his spacesuit, but if so, he could neither see it nor use it during the moonwalks.

(I say "may" with regards to the Rolex, as my understanding is that the supposition is based on images of Mitchell captured in the lunar module between moonwalks, rather than Mitchell himself saying he did so.)

Mariner1824
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posted 02-07-2022 11:18 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Mariner1824     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
You are of course correct Robert - his Speedmaster was indeed strapped to the outside of his spacesuit throughout, while his two GMT Masters were worn on the wrists and therefore underneath his spacesuit (visible, as you say, in various photos during pre-launch suit-up and in the LEM during the mission). Circumstantial evidence then rather than conclusive proof.

I had it in mind that he had subsequently stated somewhere that he did wear at least one of them on the surface (but presumably along with the Speedmaster); however unless someone else confirms the source material then it is perhaps just folklore.

At any rate, thanks for your clarification and memory bank (more accurate than mine, I’m sure.)

Philip
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From: Brussels, Belgium
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posted 02-11-2022 03:04 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Philip   Click Here to Email Philip     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
So far 8 wristwatch makes have been directly exposed to outer space:
  1. 1965, June 03 Omega Speedmaster 105.003-63 (Gemini IV - Ed White)
  2. 1966, Sept 13 Glycine Airman automatic (Gemini XI - Charles Conrad)
  3. 1971, Aug 02 Bulova 88510 chronograph (Apollo 15 - David Scott)
  4. 1994, Sept 09 Fortis Official Cosmonauts (Mir-16 - Yuri Malenchenko)
  5. 2008, Sept 27 Fiyta chronograph (Shenzhou 7 - Zhai Zhigang)
  6. 2008, Dec 23 Seiko Spacewalk Springdrive (ISS Exp 18 – Yuri Lonchakov)
  7. 2021, Sept 3 Black chronograph (ISS-65 - Oleg Novitsky)
  8. 2022, Jan 19 Panerai Radiomir or Vostok (ISS Exp 66 – Anton Shkaplerov)

Philip
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From: Brussels, Belgium
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posted 02-15-2022 12:07 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Philip   Click Here to Email Philip     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Article with a link to a database on wristwatches used during spaceflight missions on HODINKEE.

On January 19th, 2022 at 6AM, Cosmonaut Anton Shkaplerov performed an Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) from the International Space Station. On his wrist was a Panerai Radiomir 45mm PAM210; the first Panerai to have ever gone to space.

All that would be old news if you were following Robert Jackson's Watches Used In Space Exploration database. At 1,899 (and growing) entries, it's the most complete set of data regarding watches used in space.

Philip
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From: Brussels, Belgium
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posted 04-18-2022 04:50 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Philip   Click Here to Email Philip     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
During today's (April 18) spacewalk, Oleg Artemyev wearing a record three wristwatches over the red striped Orlan MKS space suit!

One looks like a Panerai Submersible. Two blue dial watches at his left-hand glove as well.

Philip
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posted 04-29-2022 09:58 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Philip   Click Here to Email Philip     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Yesterday, we witnessed the 250th planned spacewalk outside the ISS!

Again during the April 28, 2022 spacewalk, we didn't clearly spot an Omega Speedmaster strapped over the forearms of the solid-torso Orlan MKS spacesuit worn by cosmonauts Oleg Artemyev and Denis Matveev.

Cosmonaut Oleg Artemyev in the red-striped Orlan No. 5 spacesuit again (as on 18th April) wore a record three wristwatches over one Orlan spacesuit while Denis Matveev in the blue-striped Orlan MKS No. 4 spacesuit also seemed to wear personal choice of wristwatches.

Philip
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posted 07-21-2022 01:04 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Philip   Click Here to Email Philip     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
July 21, 2022: During the 251st spacewalk outside the ISS - International Space Space Station, both spacewalkers wore two wrist watches.

Russian cosmonaut Oleg Artemyev in the red-striped Orlan spacesuit wore the same watches as he did on April 28, 2022 EVA: a black chronograph on left hand and a blue dial watch on the right hand.

Italian ESA astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti in the blue-striped Orlan spacesuit (ESA and Italian flag patches) wore a quartz wrist watch which was seen ticking away at her righthand Orlan spacesuit glove.

Is this the first quartz wristwatch worn during an EVA?

Philip
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posted 07-25-2022 08:43 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Philip   Click Here to Email Philip     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
And an Omega Speedmaster on the left arm.

Philip
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posted 08-18-2022 02:53 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Philip   Click Here to Email Philip     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Again, on Wednesday's (Aug. 17) spacewalk, both cosmonauts Oleg Artemyev and Denis Matveev wore more than two wristwatches of which each had goldish kapton foil wrapped straps.

Besides a few unidentified wrist watches, MoonwatchUniverse noticed an Omega Speedmaster X-33 analog-digital chronograph on Artemyev's right forearm.

Thus far, besides the unidentified chronographs, eight different brands have been exposed directly to outer space during EVAs:

  1. 1965, June 3 Omega Speedmaster 105.003-63 (Gemini IV - Ed White)
  2. 1966, Sept 13 Glycine Airman automatic (Gemini XI - Charles Conrad)
  3. 1971, Aug 2 Bulova 88510 chronograph (Apollo 15 - David Scott)
  4. 1994, Sept 9 Fortis Official Cosmonauts (TM-19 - Yuri Malenchenko)
  5. 2008, Sept 27 Fiyta chronograph (Shenzhou 7 - Zhai Zhigang)
  6. 2008, Dec 23 Seiko Spacewalk Springdrive (ISS Exp 18 – Yuri Lonchakov)
  7. 2021, Sept 3 Konstantin Chaykin chronograph (ISS Exp 65 – Oleg Novitsky)
  8. 2022, Jan 19 Panerai Radiomir PAM210 (ISS Exp 66 – Anton Shkaplerov)

Philip
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posted 08-18-2022 01:21 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Philip   Click Here to Email Philip     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Besides a few mission patches, Oleg Artemyev's toolbox had a personal photograph and an extra black wristwatch attached to it!

Philip
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posted 08-19-2022 05:22 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Philip   Click Here to Email Philip     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Any ideas why all watches straps were wrapped in goldish Kapton foil near the actual wrist watches' lugs? Visibility? Extra strength strap?

Robert Pearlman
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posted 08-19-2022 10:47 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
My guess is that because these watches (or more specifically, their bands) haven't been rated for EVA use and are being attached to areas on the Orlan not designed to accommodate a watch, the Kapton is being used as a safety measure to secure the watch body to its bracelet to avoid it inadvertently breaking loose.

Philip
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posted 08-27-2022 12:17 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Philip   Click Here to Email Philip     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Indeed Robert there are several reasons:
  1. Extra attachment
  2. Thermal insulation against 200°C differences
  3. Static insulation against electrical fields associated with moving fast through low density Atomic oxygen.
  4. Easier to spot both during and after the EVA as some of these were personal pieces
Did you spot the personal photos, mission patches, etc., attached to their toolbox? These could easily be seen on Samantha Cristoforetti's toolbox during the July 21, 2022 EVA.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 08-27-2022 08:49 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
This may be an unpopular opinion, especially among collectors, but I find the additional watches (as well as dolls and other 3D objects) an unfortunate turn of events for spacewalks.

It is one thing to fly these items into space — there is a long history of astronauts and cosmonauts doing so — but to tape them to your spacesuit for the sole purpose of creating mementos seems to be trivializing what is still a dangerous activity.

The extra watches take what was once a tool and turns it it into a souvenir. Then again, there is no reason to wear a watch on an EVA (which is why they are absent from the U.S. EMU) so maybe all watches are extraneous items.

oly
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posted 08-27-2022 08:45 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for oly   Click Here to Email oly     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
If the watches are the private property of the crew and they have been permitted to carry them following safety measures and risk mitigation, then I feel that the watch would be a personal memento of the spacewalk that the crew member can keep forever. Further, If the other crew on board who are not spacewalking are allowed a personal item to be carried by the spacewalker to memorialize their contribution to the crew endeavour, then I feel this is something special.

If, on the other hand, these watches find their way to the open market or end up in the hands of someone who is not a member of the expedition crew then I agree that it is an unfortunate turn of events for spacewalks.

mercsim
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posted 08-28-2022 09:06 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for mercsim   Click Here to Email mercsim     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I'm not so sure I go along with "no reason to wear a watch..." I would like to hear from other pilots/astronauts but I know what I do and the pilot community I hang out with. We wear a watch. I have about 3000 hours of flying and Test flying including 13 first flights. Most of the airplanes I fly have several GPS, MFD's, panel clocks, clocks in the radios, etc. But I wouldn't get in the cockpit without a functioning and reliable wrist watch. As we go thru flight cards, its just instinctive to glance at your wrist for a periodic time check. I think we do it without hardly thinking about it. Photos of astronauts inside the ISS always show them wearing one, and sometimes two watches. There are clocks on every computer, piece of equipment, etc and they are almost always on the radio so I suppose they don't 'have any reason" to wear one either, but they do.

I understand if there are mission rules against wearing them outside for safety. But I think its a bit of a stretch to say there is no reason to wear one. Even with all that equipment, pilots wear watches.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 08-28-2022 11:16 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I was only referring to wearing a watch on a spacewalk.

There are plenty of reasons to wear watches inside the space station, but outside, not so much. The last American to wear a watch on an EVA was on Skylab 3.

Even the cosmonauts do not use them, and they are issued a Speedmaster to wear on each spacewalk. If you listen to the EVAs (as I do), the cosmonauts (and astronauts) ask the ground for mission elapsed time updates and if an activity needs to happen at a specific time or be timed, it is the ground (or the intravehicular officer inside the station) who handles that.

Philip
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posted 08-30-2022 04:54 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Philip   Click Here to Email Philip     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
In fact, during the Space Shuttle era the Omega Speedmaster chronograph has been used in the righthand glove of the American EMU during spacewalks between April 1983 (STS-6) and September 1993 (STS-51). Hard to see, but the Speedmaster was sewn-in the TMG - Thermal Micrometeor Garment layer of the righthand glove.

It was no longer included in the new EMU versions 1994 onwards! Check STS-6 NASA photos STS-6-22-026 and STS-6-22-049 as good examples.

#MoonwatchUniverse discussed this here.

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