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  The search for the goodwill moon rocks (Page 1)

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Author Topic:   The search for the goodwill moon rocks
mikej
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posted 09-14-2009 07:11 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for mikej   Click Here to Email mikej     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
collectSPACE got a mention in an article about the current location of moon rocks gifted to foreign governments.
Of 135 rocks from the Apollo 17 mission given away to nations or their leaders, only about 25 have been located by CollectSpace.com, a Web site for space history buffs that has long attempted to compile a list.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 09-16-2009 03:59 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The Associated Press' renewed interested in the location of the Apollo 11 Lunar Sample Displays and Apollo 17 Goodwill Moon Rocks inspired a long-overdue redesign of our guides to both: These guides live under the Resources section of our site should you want to find them in the future.

dom
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posted 10-19-2009 12:33 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for dom   Click Here to Email dom     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Just to clarify the story about the "dumped" Irish Apollo 11 rock sample, the 1977 fire mentioned totally destroyed Dunsink Observatory's famed library building — so I'd imagine finding these small samples amongst the gutted building would have been almost impossible at the time.

I'd like to mention that the other sample (from Apollo 17) is now the centrepiece of a very nice exhibit in Dublin's Collins Barracks museum, alongside a display of signed photographs and patches from every Apollo mission, numerous meteorites of various sizes and a beautiful handmade model of the Saturn V rocket on its launchpad that stands about five foot tall.

Playalinda
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posted 01-12-2010 06:40 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Playalinda     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Moon rocks from first and last Apollo missions turn up in locked cabinet in Hawaii:
Missing moon rocks from the first and last human lunar landings have been discovered in a locked cabinet in Hawaii.

The rare rocks from the Apollo 11 and Apollo 17 missions were found last week during a routine inventory of gifts to the Hawaii governor's office over the years.

The rocks were given to the people of Hawaii during the Nixon administration, but they were presumed lost when a noted moon rock tracker and former NASA employee said their whereabouts were unknown.

Lenny Klompus, a spokesman for Hawaii Gov. Linda Lingle, says the rocks were never actually missing. He says state employees knew the rocks were in a secured cabinet, but they didn't know which cabinet.

He says the moon rocks will probably be put on public display soon.

AstronautBrian
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posted 01-12-2010 05:38 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for AstronautBrian   Click Here to Email AstronautBrian     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Not too long ago, I wrote letters to the Secretary of State of Louisiana, and four of the largest history and science museums in the state. I told them about the goodwill rocks and inquired if they had knowledge of the whereabouts for Louisiana's rock.

The only response I had was from the Secretary of State. He seemed very interested in locating the rock, as the letter was from him and not some staff member.

Anyway, they did not know the location of the rock, but knew that Governor McKeithen would have received the gift. The Secretary stated that they would try to locate the rock, but haven't heard anything in a couple of months.

If push comes to shove, I'll have to find out who was entrusted with Governor McKeithen's papers, and see if I can access those archives.

mikej
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posted 06-14-2010 07:07 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for mikej   Click Here to Email mikej     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
New Jersey's moon rock is missing
Brendan Byrne, who was governor at the time, and his chief of staff said they don't recall what happened to it.

Curator David Parris said the rock never came to the State Museum here.

Hawkman
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posted 02-06-2011 02:55 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Hawkman   Click Here to Email Hawkman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The New Jersey State Police are looking for missing Apollo 17 moon rocks thought to be here in New Jersey.
If $5 million worth of moon rocks happen to be junking up your home, could you give New Jersey State Police a call? Detectives will arrive at, well, warp speed to reclaim state property — and solve a 35-year-old mystery.

The rocks were supposed to go on public display starting in 1976, when an astronaut presented the Governor’s Office with goodwill tokens of Apollo 17, the last manned lunar landing. But last year, researchers, curators and former Gov. Brendan Byrne told The Record they had no idea where the gift went.

Now, state police confirm they are looking for leads on the rocks, whose estimated black-market value is $5 million.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 06-30-2011 12:18 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Houston's CBS-affiliate KHOU reports that an Apollo-era moon rock gifted to the State of Alaska as a goodwill gesture by President Richard M. Nixon and thought to have been lost has been in the possession of a man who found it as a teenager in 1973.
In a lawsuit filed against the State of Alaska, Arthur C. Anderson claimed that he is the rightful owner of the moon rock, which the lawsuit said he found in a pile of debris after a fire at the Transportation Branch of the Alaska State Museum in Anchorage.

spaced out
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posted 06-30-2011 01:10 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for spaced out   Click Here to Email spaced out     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The suit claims that "5.2 The State of Alaska became the true owner of the Plaque when it was gifted to the State of Alaska by President Nixon."

This is surely contrary to the established legal status of all NASA recovered lunar samples.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 06-30-2011 01:21 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
In the specific case of the two goodwill gifts (Apollo 11, Apollo 17) ownership was transferred from the U.S. federal government to the state, province or nation to which the sample was presented.

That is why NASA hasn't maintained records as to where the goodwill gifts are, and why our own location guides exist.

spaced out
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posted 07-01-2011 05:52 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for spaced out   Click Here to Email spaced out     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Does that mean a cash-strapped state or nation could legally sell one of these presentations?

Anyone know what the Greek government's eBay user id is?

Robert Pearlman
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posted 07-01-2011 06:02 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Yes, if the laws of the land allowed such (or were changed to allow such) for public gifts.

Brazil briefly considered selling their Apollo 17 goodwill moon rock to fund expansions to the Museu dom Diogo de Souza in Braga, but public outcry put an end to those plans.

Romania's Apollo 17 sample was reported by the Christian Science Monitor as having been among the possessions of dictator Ceausescu to be auctioned. Post-auction reports however, included no mention of the moon rock being sold.

Glint
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posted 09-22-2011 09:21 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Glint   Click Here to Email Glint     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The long missing Arkansas state moon rock, returned by Apollo 17, was found stashed in papers belonging to William Jefferson Clinton.
A long-lost, highly valuable Moon rock brought back from the Apollo 17 mission has turned up in the files of Bill Clinton.

The rock was one of 50 presented to each state, and was given to Arkansas while the ex-president was governor. The rock, worth millions of dollars, had been missing since at least 1980 until an archivist found it in old gubernatorial papers. Bobby Roberts, director of the Central Arkansas Library System, told Reuters the archivist opened a box previously archived as "Arkansas flag plaque." The rock and a state flag were originally affixed to the plaque, but the rock had fallen off and the plaque had been misplaced.

"The moon rock, which is in a plastic container, had fallen off the plaque," Roberts said, explaining that the rock was at the bottom of the box. "The archivist immediately knew what he had discovered."

Robert Pearlman
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posted 09-22-2011 09:26 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The rock was one of 50 presented to each state, and was given to Arkansas while the ex-president was governor.
Arkansas was presented with its Apollo 17 goodwill moon rock by astronaut Dick Truly in 1976, when David Pryor was governor. Bill Clinton didn't become governor until 1979.
"The archivist immediately knew what he had discovered."
The archivist knew because he had read the previous reporting of Sarah Wile with the Arkansas Democrat-Gazette, who had written about the search for the moon rocks by former NASA Office of Inspector General special agent Joseph Gutheinz, who today as a professor has challenged his students to locate the goodwill moon rocks.

Gutheinz has collaborated his and his students' search with collectSPACE's own efforts and considers our guides to now be the official registry for goodwill gifts.

AJ
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posted 10-26-2011 12:35 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for AJ   Click Here to Email AJ     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
In a lawsuit filed against the State of Alaska, Arthur C. Anderson claimed that he is the rightful owner of the moon rock, which the lawsuit said he found in a pile of debris after a fire at the Transportation Branch of the Alaska State Museum in Anchorage.
The latest issue of Alaska magazine has an article about the lawsuit involving Coleman Anderson. According to him or his lawyers, Anderson is interested in claiming the sample so that he can eventually sell it.

I don't know much about the rules about these things, but would he be allowed to do that? How is that any different than the old lady who was apprehended at a Denny's?

Personally, I think he knows he's in the wrong and that's why he's keeping the sample "out of the country". Any thoughts, opinions on this specific case would be appreciated. Thanks!

Robert Pearlman
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posted 10-26-2011 12:51 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The lunar sample in question was legally gifted to the state of Alaska as a goodwill presentation. Mr. Anderson is now trying to have a court reassign legal ownership to him, claiming that he recovered it from the refuse from a fire and has cared for it since then.

There are significant questions about the circumstances that led to him obtaining the lunar sample display. If the court case he initiated proceeds, Anderson will need to address those concerns.

HistorianMom
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posted 10-26-2011 12:54 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for HistorianMom   Click Here to Email HistorianMom     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I'm not a lawyer nor do I play one on TV, but I have always told my kids that if you "find" something valuable, it isn't just yours. You make an effort to find the rightful owner. The legal term may be "exercise due diligence." Of course he knows they are not his.

gliderpilotuk
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posted 02-20-2012 05:11 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for gliderpilotuk   Click Here to Email gliderpilotuk     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
BBC Magazine: What has happened to NASA's missing moon rocks?
Some moon rocks have gone astray at times of revolution or political transition. The US national archives show that a rock was presented to the late Romanian dictator, Nicolae Ceausescu, but Gutheinz believes it was sold after his execution.

Then there is the mysterious tale of how - after a fire at an observatory in Dublin - Ireland's Apollo 11 moon rock ended up lying in a rubbish dump, after apparently being thrown out with the rest of the debris...

As the article says, you have to love the story of the Irish mooon rock.

YankeeClipper
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posted 02-22-2012 11:49 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for YankeeClipper   Click Here to Email YankeeClipper     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Irish state broadcaster RTE aired a short piece about the dumped Apollo 11 moon rock on the RTE1 Six One News on Tuesday, 21 Feb. 2012. The clip is shown at 0:12:44 to 0:14:55 and is viewable until 28 Feb 2012.

Part explanation for the disposal into landfill was the unfortunate very close geographical proximity of Dunsink Observatory to Dunsink Municipal Dump. It would be interesting to know the cause of the 1977 fire and whether this was possibly an act of arson covering an act of theft.

The existing Apollo 17 goodwill moon rock and flown flag were last displayed in 2009 - the fact that the National Museum of Ireland in Dublin don't have this on permanent secure display is disappointing but may be due to the fate of the destroyed rock.

YankeeClipper
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posted 02-22-2012 02:57 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for YankeeClipper   Click Here to Email YankeeClipper     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Dunsink Observatory Outbreak Of Fire in the Irish Astronomical Journal provides an excellent account of the events and circumstances of the 03 Oct 1977 fire thought to have destroyed the Irish Apollo 11 Goodwill Moon rock exhibit.

The article explores the possibility of arson which is definitely plausible given the day, 01:20 time of fire, rapid onset of fire, and presence of unidentified individuals in the vicinity at 00:55.

The article also alludes to expected trouble from vandalism and malicious damage. Dunsink Observatory was built in a rural location in 1785 but found itself sandwiched between the Dublin housing estates of Cabra and Finglas that sprung up in the 1950s/1960s. New neighbours also included a traveller camp and municipal dump. In the late 1970s the observatory unfortunately found itself in the middle of a high youth population in two economically depressed areas that were regularly subject to gang fights, crime and vandalism.

Although Dublin Fire Brigade found no evidence of forced entry, it remains a distinct possibility that the moon rock could have been stolen and the forensic evidence destroyed by arson.

gliderpilotuk
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posted 02-23-2012 03:57 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for gliderpilotuk   Click Here to Email gliderpilotuk     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
And I'd just packed my shovel for my next monthly business trip to Dublin...

dom
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posted 02-23-2012 04:24 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for dom   Click Here to Email dom     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
In a way I hope the moon rock WAS stolen before the fire started. At least that way it might "surface" again one day! Something that is unlikely to happen if it really is buried deep under all that landfill...

YankeeClipper
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posted 02-24-2012 12:07 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for YankeeClipper   Click Here to Email YankeeClipper     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Further information sourced from Barry Pickup of the Irish Astronomical Society now confirms that Professor Patrick Wayman (Director of Dunsink Observatory 1964-1993) was quite certain that the 03 Oct 1977 fire had been a deliberate act.

Following the destruction of the Meridian Room in the blaze, the 200kg 8ft Solid Brass 1808 Ramsden Transit Circle Telescope was removed from the ruins to an outhouse for storage from whence it was stolen in Nov 1981 and never recovered.

The conventional story puts the loss of Ireland's Apollo 11 Goodwill Moon Rock down to accident/oversight and ends at the bottom of a landfill. A little research and some local knowledge of the area's history of criminality suggests that there may be an entirely different ending to this story!

YankeeClipper
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posted 02-24-2012 04:46 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for YankeeClipper   Click Here to Email YankeeClipper     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Dunsink Observatory in the 1980s - the Meridian Room is the structure to the left of the main building and originally housed Ireland's Apollo 11 Goodwill Moon Rock.


Photo credit: John McConnell

dom
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posted 02-25-2012 05:17 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for dom   Click Here to Email dom     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by YankeeClipper:
...some local knowledge of the area's history of criminality suggests that there may be an entirely different ending to this story!
I think you are giving this local criminal element a level of sophistication they don't really deserve!

The only "hope" that this moon rock might have been stolen is if it was 'stolen to order'. Realistically I don't think people knew the historic/financial value of these Apollo 11 samples back then...

YankeeClipper
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posted 02-25-2012 03:06 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for YankeeClipper   Click Here to Email YankeeClipper     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The fate of Ireland's Apollo 11 Goodwill Moon Rock and Mission Flown Flag is a genuine mystery that may never be solved.

It is worth considering that the building in which they were housed was almost 200 years old with multiple access points via windows/doors/shutters. Security measures were limited and rudimentary by today's standards. The grounds were isolated, not well lit, contained blind spots, and were quite accessible from the fields to the rear. These vulnerabilities would not have been difficult to exploit by passing vandals or a determined criminal. Public open nights would have afforded the opportunity to case the buildings in advance.

Simple human error from one of the director's children could have resulted in an unsecured door/window that night. The Apollo 11 exhibit would have been a potentially lucrative, highly portable, and easy steal for both an opportunistic or professional thief. A fire could have been deliberately set out of sheer malice or to destroy forensic evidence.

That part of North Dublin in the late 1970s suffered from continual random acts of vandalism, graffiti, arson, handbag thefts, car thefts, domestic/commercial burglaries, bank/post office raids etc. Suspects ranged from juvenile delinquents, junkies, career criminals to paramilitaries. Anything not nailed down and flak-jacketed was fair game. Dunsink Observatory was basically a sitting duck, as the subsequent 1981 theft of the Transit Circle for scrap metal value proved.

The sad reality is that the exhibit could have been destroyed by an electrical fire, torched by kids, stolen and tossed in the dump, stolen and fenced for drugs, or stolen and sold to a collector. Perceptions of the exhibit would have ranged from novelty to treasure. Think of the multiple robberies of the Beit Art Collection from Russborough House in Wicklow for a guide to how such treasures were handled by Dublin's criminal fraternity.

I just think that while the conventional narrative may be a great media story, it overlooks the social context of the time and the possibility that this artifact survives somewhere to this day.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 02-25-2012 03:16 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by YankeeClipper:
I just think that while the conventional narrative may be a great media story, it overlooks the social context of the time and the possibility that this artifact survives somewhere to this day.
I need to find the document, but I recall reading that Ireland's government reported to the U.S. government that the sample display was indeed accidentally discarded in the aftermath of the fire.

YankeeClipper
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posted 02-25-2012 07:00 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for YankeeClipper   Click Here to Email YankeeClipper     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
That would be interesting to read. I'm sure the Irish government would have gone with the most logical and probable scenario presented to them by the Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies at the Observatory. After all it's a very reasonable assumption.

My concern is two-fold:

  • The cause of the fire was never determined. Therefore, arson can not be definitively ruled out. There was a high index of suspicion regarding the blaze, especially held by the Director of Dunsink Observatory. If arson were the cause, it would suggest the presence of unauthorised individual(s) and raise the possibility of theft.

  • There doesn't appear to have been any positive identification of any remains of the artifact. It's unlikely anything would have survived such an intense fire, but it seems no serious effort was made to find it. Without any remains, one can not definitively conclude the artifact was in fact actually onsite during the fire. According to Dr. Ian Elliott, a Dunsink Observatory researcher in 1977:
    It was only afterwards that we realised that the bit of Apollo 11 Moon rock could not be found.

    It was gathered up with all of the other debris and dumped in the municipal dump which was conveniently just across the road.

    If we'd had any perception of the rock's value, perhaps all of the debris would have been sifted by archaeologists and it might have been found.

I would never definitively rule out alternative hypotheses until it is conclusively proved that they are either impossible or highly improbable.

SpaceAholic
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posted 05-24-2012 06:45 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for SpaceAholic   Click Here to Email SpaceAholic     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Associated Press: Moon chips from Vegas casino mogul sent to NASA
It's been a long, strange trip for what appears to be several tiny chips of lunar rock that found their way into a casino mogul's hands after being collected by the first men on the moon.

If they're real, they were plucked from the lunar surface by Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin, given by then-President Richard Nixon to former Nicaraguan dictator Anastasio Somoza Debayle, pilfered by a Costa Rican mercenary soldier-turned Contra rebel, traded to a Baptist missionary for unknown items, then sold to a flamboyant Las Vegas casino owner who squirreled them away in a safety deposit box.

Now, more than 2.5 years after Bob Stupak's death, an attorney for his estate has sent to NASA officials in Houston a tabletop display featuring the four gray chips the size of grains of rice. They're magnified in a Lucite dome about as big around as a U.S. 50-cent piece set with a small blue and white Nicaraguan flag. Combined, the chips weigh 0.05 grams.

garymilgrom
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posted 05-24-2012 06:46 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for garymilgrom   Click Here to Email garymilgrom     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Sounds like the lawyer for the deceased owner's estate is doing the right thing. Kudos to him for his honesty.

chet
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posted 05-24-2012 11:17 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for chet   Click Here to Email chet     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Considering what happened to the sample the first time around, NASA would probably be doing the more responsible thing, in my opinion, by holding onto it in a secure place (as much as NASA itself is capable of doing so) "in trust for the people of Nicaragua".

Robert Pearlman
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posted 08-17-2012 10:51 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Juneau Empire provides an update on the status of Alaska's Apollo 11 lunar sample display.
Alaska's historic moon rocks, collected by Apollo 11 astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin in 1969, are back in NASA's custody.

Now, Alaska State Museums Curator Bob Banghart says he'd like to see them back in an Alaska museum.

"They belong to the state of Alaska, and they belong in the museum's collection," said Banghart, who has been following the case of the moon rocks for years.

...Coleman Anderson sued the state, claiming he owned the rocks and wanted to be declared the legitimate owner. The Alaska Attorney General's Office, representing the museum, is disputing the claim.

...Assistant Attorney General Neil Slotnick represents the museum in the case. He was unavailable Thursday but presented a summary of the case to the Board of Education recently.

Slotnick said that Anderson's claim of how he came to possess the moon rocks did not convey ownership of the rocks.

"He claimed that after the fire he found the plaque in the rubble and debris at the museum site, and that he saved it from destruction," Slotnick said.

Whether that account holds sway with the court will be decided later, but Slotnick said the state was successful in getting a court order to force Anderson to turn the moon rocks over to NASA for verification and safekeeping until eventual ownership is established.

Anderson first objected, saying the rocks were overseas, but did comply with the order, Slotnick said.

Hart Sastrowardoyo
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posted 11-26-2012 06:37 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Hart Sastrowardoyo   Click Here to Email Hart Sastrowardoyo     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Associated Press reports Minnesota's Apollo 11 moon rocks have been found:
The Minnesota National Guard said Monday it found a few small fragments of the moon’s surface in storage in a state building in St. Paul. They’ll be turned over to the state Historical Society on Wednesday.

mikej
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posted 12-07-2012 05:52 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for mikej   Click Here to Email mikej     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Alaska has retaken possession of its Apollo 11 moon rock display:
A display of moon rocks that disappeared from an Alaska museum after an arson fire nearly four decades ago has been returned to the state following the settlement of a lawsuit by a man who claimed he rescued the rocks from the rubble.

Hart Sastrowardoyo
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posted 12-18-2012 03:56 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Hart Sastrowardoyo   Click Here to Email Hart Sastrowardoyo     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Not missing, but New York says it will display its Goodwill Rock:
The state's rarely-displayed fragment will be on view in the Albany museum's (New York State Museum) lobby from Wednesday through Feb. 10.

spacehiker
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posted 06-08-2013 12:26 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for spacehiker   Click Here to Email spacehiker     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Well I think I may have located the UK's flown moon rock and flown Apollo 11 flag.

On a recent visit to 10 Downing Street, I spotted it sitting on a side table in the hallway outside Margaret's Thatcher's old study. I managed to take a few photos of it.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 06-08-2013 12:30 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Yep! That's it — we've had the location listed on our guide since spotting it in the virtual tour presented on the Downing Street website.

spacehiker
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posted 06-08-2013 12:34 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for spacehiker   Click Here to Email spacehiker     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I did a double take when I saw it sitting there opposite a presentation from a South American country.

dom
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posted 07-02-2018 04:54 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for dom   Click Here to Email dom     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I just discovered this old article amongst a stash of press clippings in a secondhand bookshop. It shows Cernan and Young presenting moonrock to Irish President Erskine Childers (right) in 1973. When Childers died suddenly in office in 1974 his widow asked if she could keep it - thankfully she was turned down!

YankeeClipper
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posted 07-04-2018 06:32 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for YankeeClipper   Click Here to Email YankeeClipper     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Good spot - well done! That photo may have been taken in August or September 1973 at Áras an Uachtaráin in Dublin's Phoenix Park, shortly after Childers became President. Gene Cernan and John Young were guests of honor at the Fédération Aéronautique Internationale (FAI) General Conference held in Dublin from 02-07 September 1973 according to this photo.

This site confirms Cernan's presentation at the Áras in 1973, and also the brief (photographed) appearance of a piece of the Moon at the US Embassy in Ballsbridge, Dublin in February 1970.


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