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  NASA/contractor ID badges and passes (Page 1)

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Author Topic:   NASA/contractor ID badges and passes
413 is in
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posted 12-03-2006 03:58 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for 413 is in   Click Here to Email 413 is in     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote

This Gemini Area Permit belonged to M-G-A suit and equipment technician Walter D. Salyer. Does anyone know the significance of the "B" and "I" ink stamps on this type of badge? To the best of my recollection these are the only letters that I have seen appear on this type of badge. Additionally, I have seen this particular badge advertised as a Gemini 6 badge. However, I am not so sure that this is the case. In NASA photo 65-H-0431 (see above) John Young is seen wearing a similar badge with the number "6" during preps for the GT-3 mission. Any ideas?

The Forbush Saturn Operations badge is of a standard type that I have seen in many Apollo-era photos. My question on this badge is what is the significance of the letter designators in the blocks on the bottom of this badge? This badge has "B", "C", and "S" designators. I have seen others with an additional "E" added in the last column. Additionally, I have not been able to track down any info on J. Forbush. Any info at all here would be greatly appreciated.

Finally, the green unsigned NASA LOD (Launch Operations Directorate) badge is a total mystery to me. Any ideas as to when it was in use and the significance of the numeral "2"? I would guess that this badge pre-dates Apollo but can obviously be no earlier than when Charles Buckley became NASA security chief. Does anyone know the date when Buckley first began as security chief?

dtemple
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posted 12-03-2006 10:50 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for dtemple   Click Here to Email dtemple     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I can help a bit. The Saturn Operations badge is like one in my collection. A person who worked at the Cape during this era a few years back had a similar badge listed on ebay so I asked what the letters B, C, and S meant. He said B=blockhouse, C=complex, and S=service structure. As I remember he also stated there was sometimes another letter but couldn't remember that one. Perhaps E=engineering building. My guess is based on a recent story that the engineering building at pad 34 is to be demolished.

Go4Launch
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posted 12-04-2006 06:45 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Go4Launch   Click Here to Email Go4Launch     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Gemini area permits were intended to be used for multiple flights and were the basic credential. Other badges then gave the bearer more specialized access.

The "BI" on them stands for "background investigation," signifying the bearer had passed. They provided greater access than area permits without the "BI" stamp.

413 is in
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posted 02-23-2007 12:07 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for 413 is in   Click Here to Email 413 is in     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
For what it's worth, the latest dated example of a badge that I have seen with a Charles Buckley signature appears on an LCC employee badge dated October 1, 1978. Buckley apparently was still employed by NASA into the 1980's as I have seen him pictured with the STS-1 crew just prior to launch in 1981. However, I have not seen his name on any STS press badges. Early shuttle press pass and badge examples that I have seen are signed by Richard G. Smith as validating signature. Smith served as KSC Director from 1979-1986.

With all this said, I'm still trying to verify when Buckley was originally hired as Security Chief. I am also curious as to when he left NASA. Does anyone know if he is still living?

martin00sr
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posted 01-22-2008 11:59 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for martin00sr   Click Here to Email martin00sr     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I have recently taken interest in old NASA ID-badges and I have been lucky a few times on ebay... at least I'm pretty sure about that. But I was wondering if anyone has some advice about judging for example authenticity of ID-badges/press passes and such. What's the risk of being offered fakes, what should I look for (serial numbers, lamination, clips etc.)? Thanks.

Russ Still
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posted 01-22-2008 12:18 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Russ Still   Click Here to Email Russ Still     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Regarding authenticity, I'm happy to say that so far I know of no fakes in this area of collecting. The prices aren't high enough (at least for now) to warrant forgers printing up counterfeits.

Regarding badges, there are so many, from so many sources that it would be difficult to catalog them all. Some badges, particularly from contractors and media venues carry no weight as true credentials. Although from the period, it might be more proper to classify them as souvenirs. They are, nonetheless, very collectible.

martin00sr
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posted 01-23-2008 05:45 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for martin00sr   Click Here to Email martin00sr     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thanks for your reassuring reply. I was uncertain since some of the badges look very good considering they're 40 years old...

413 is in
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posted 01-27-2008 05:32 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for 413 is in   Click Here to Email 413 is in     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I've been collecting NASA credentials for several years now and, unfortunately, have occasionally run into some examples that are of questionable authenticity.

Two examples of which are posted above. Although it is still a relative rarity to find outright forgeries (as I believe the above examples are), the field of badge collecting is on the rise and, most likely as prices continue to escalate, we will undoubtedly see more of this type of fraud in the market place.

Both the Apollo 14 and Jim Lovell badges were offered and sold on eBay over the past year or so. Although these particular examples were advertised by the seller as "part of a collection for which there is no verification of authenticity", I have seen other similar type sales for which no such disclaimer is mentioned. I believe that these items are worthless, even as curiosities. They do hold marginal value, perhaps, as learning tools for what to avoid when looking to purchase authentic items for your own individual collections.

I'm far from an expert but have been collecting long enough to recognize the subtle nuances that differentiate vintage items from those of a reproduction. For example, on the Apollo 14 badge, the grayscale watermark of the NASA meatball logo and the computer generated "signature" of Kurt Debus (in a modern day font) stands out like a sore thumb in comparison to the authentic example with colored watermark and proper facsimile signature. To a lesser extent, it can be seen that the badges differ somewhat in physical dimension. I'll leave it up to you to spot the discrepancies between the fake "Lovell" badge and the authentic Liebergot example.

In short, just like all areas of collecting, the more familiar you become with the authentic items, the easier it becomes to spot the forgeries. It's not rocket science, but it can be dangerous if you don't know what you are doing.

My advice:

  1. If you are new to badge collecting, buy only from trusted and knowledgeable sources first.

  2. Build your collection slowly until you are comfortable with the various types of badges that are out there and what they look like and how they are constructed (type of paper or material used, physical dimensions, watermarks, signatures, lamination style, clip styles, etc.).

  3. If you are buying over the Internet, ask for clean hi-resolution scans if none are provided originally. Items, particularly from the early space program (M-G-A), should in most cases show normal signs of usage (even if minor) if they were truly used and worn. Even if the badges were issued but unused, normal signs of age are usually apparent in some sense. Check for signs that the badge has not been printed by computer (font styles, print patterns, etc.). Always ask to see the back of the badge if not originally shown. Sometimes, the back is blank (by design) but this is relatively rare. Learn which badges are of this type and which are not. Verify that the proper type of info is present on the back of the badge and check for consistency with other known examples.

  4. Ask a fellow collector for help if you are unsure.

FFrench
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posted 01-27-2008 05:39 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for FFrench     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Might some of these be the movie / miniseries props that I know a lot of people in this part of the world have - used in Apollo 13, From the Earth to the Moon, etc? So deliberately created to be fakes, but for good reasons...

413 is in
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posted 01-27-2008 05:46 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for 413 is in   Click Here to Email 413 is in     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I've seen some of those prop badges and they are usually marketed as such as there is usually a premium offered for this type of item (particularly if it was actually used and can be seen in known footage).

Joel Katzowitz
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posted 01-17-2009 08:58 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Joel Katzowitz   Click Here to Email Joel Katzowitz     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I recently picked up a Gemini white room access badge. The badge has a yellow vertical stripe on it's face. My understanding is the color of the stripe indicates the level of security clearance. I've seen badge examples with red and blue stripes as well.

Can anyone give more information about the stripes?

E2M Lem Man
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posted 01-18-2009 02:47 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for E2M Lem Man   Click Here to Email E2M Lem Man     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by FFrench:
Might some of these be the movie / miniseries props that I know a lot of people in this part of the world have - used in Apollo 13, From the Earth to the Moon, etc?
No, these are fakes and not any from "Apollo 13" or "From the Earth to the Moon", as I worked on those and have a collection of those badges and some from "Marooned" too.

The reverse lettering is VERY contemporary, and we used on E2M the lettering from the time, even on our Rockwell and Grumman badges.

Joel Katzowitz
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posted 01-24-2009 08:01 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Joel Katzowitz   Click Here to Email Joel Katzowitz     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Joel Katzowitz:
Can anyone give more information about the stripes?
Surely someone has an answer regarding the significance of the vertical yellow stripe on my Gemini 6 badge. I read somewhere that in other government agencies a yellow striped badge indicates a "contractor".

Ken Havekotte
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posted 01-27-2009 08:27 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ken Havekotte   Click Here to Email Ken Havekotte     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Various color stripes on a variety of badges could indicate that person's identity and/or agency, department, or company he/she works for. I even have a few early badges where a color stripe had been used for news media reps. in covering certain activities.

Joel Katzowitz
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posted 01-27-2009 12:06 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Joel Katzowitz   Click Here to Email Joel Katzowitz     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I didn't realize this was such a convoluted subject, I probably should have known better.

413 is in
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posted 04-19-2009 03:46 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for 413 is in   Click Here to Email 413 is in     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Hello again fellow badge collectors. Here's another question for you: Does anyone know what "APIP" stands for on the pictured Apollo 17 Area Permit?

nasamad
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posted 04-19-2009 05:57 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for nasamad   Click Here to Email nasamad     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I won't claim to be any kind of expert on anything Bill, but I have a few backstage passes from concerts I have attended and a few of them look similar to that with the repeated writing being part of the paper and not necessarily anything to do with the info on the pass itself. I think it may be some kind of security issued paper/card stock.

413 is in
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posted 04-20-2009 10:09 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for 413 is in   Click Here to Email 413 is in     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Adam, thanks for your reply. You could be right. I know what you're talking about in terms of using special paper/watermarks for security purposes.

I have seen a couple of other instances where this has been done on other types of NASA badges. Examples of these can be seen in the image below.

The image on the left was taken from a NASA employee identification badge for the Manned Spacecraft Center. This particular badge was issued in 1962. As can be seen, it includes a background image of a repeated NASA insignia. It is interesting to note that the paper was apparently printed by the Bureau of Engraving and Printing.

The image on the right was taken from a Gemini era Crew Visitor badge which was issued by the Kennedy Space Center security department. The background includes a repeated series of "KSC".

So, on the Apollo 17 Area Permit, I guess "APIP" could possibly stand for the company that made the paper for the badge. Then again...

Marc05A
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posted 05-05-2009 02:25 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Marc05A   Click Here to Email Marc05A     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I have a question regarding the MCC badges during Apollo. What is the meaning of the different letters that we can see on those badges? Most of them have a big "A" in the lower part, but a few of them have a "V" or even a "B".

Same question for the NASA Employee ID badge in the 60's. Some badges have a series of letters each side of the photograph... Bob Gilruth had R, S, T, H...

ilbasso
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posted 05-05-2009 08:56 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for ilbasso   Click Here to Email ilbasso     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Bumping back to Bill's question a couple of weeks ago about the APIP in the Area Permit badge...

I have Area Permits from several Apollo missions. All of my examples come in one of two 'flavors' - "Visitor - To Be Escorted", which has a plain background, or ones like Bill's illustration, which are issued to specific individuals and have specific clearance areas indicated with letters. These latter ones are the only ones with the repeated APIP background, and they also have the mission decals (with different shaped symbols for each mission) as opposed to the mission number just stamped on the badge. My hunch is that the patterned background is there primarily so that Security could easily and quickly distinguish between people who could be in restricted areas without an escort and those people who should be led around.

As to what APIP stands for... haven't been able to find out. There are plenty of likely candidates!! Apollo Program Infrastructure Protection? Area Permit Identification Program?

paulus humungus
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posted 01-17-2010 10:45 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for paulus humungus   Click Here to Email paulus humungus     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I have an Apollo 11 launch pass in my collection - the type with the Apollo 11 mission emblem and the full moon next to it, however my pass seems to be different than most that I have seen. The background colour is grey rather than the usual light blue. Has anybody seen this difference before? I know that passes from other mission launches have passes of different colours such Apollo 13, ie. orange / white variants.

413 is in
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posted 01-17-2010 12:57 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for 413 is in   Click Here to Email 413 is in     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I too have an example of this variant of the Apollo 11 launch viewing pass in my collection. As seen in the picture below, VP Agnew can be seen wearing the more commonly found light blue version of this badge while on the viewing stand at the press site.

My guess is that the blue version was for assigned seating while the other variation of this badge was for SRO (standing room only). It's just a theory, though.

paulus humungus
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posted 01-17-2010 01:05 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for paulus humungus   Click Here to Email paulus humungus     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thank you Bill. Yes, this version is the same as mine. Interesting. Does anybody know the reason for these different colours?

paulus humungus
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posted 01-19-2010 03:30 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for paulus humungus   Click Here to Email paulus humungus     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
A big thank you to Ken Havecotte for his answer to my question. He replied as follows:
YES--I have seen background gray-colored VIP badges for the launch of Apollo 11. Actually, the gray badges were for general use whereas the light-blue printed badges were mostly for higher-up VIPs attending the historic liftoff.

capoetc
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posted 01-19-2010 08:17 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for capoetc   Click Here to Email capoetc     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Mine has a grey background. It originally belonged to a physicist from NASA-Lewis.

Timothy
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posted 07-27-2010 10:49 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Timothy   Click Here to Email Timothy     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Anyone seen an Apollo 11 badge like this one? Any info would be appreciated.

I have a badge that is made like someone had hand drawn the picture. The picture on top is showing a part of the moon with a large numeral 11 on its surface. The Command Module is shown going overhead and the Lunar Module is shown coming in for a landing. Across the top "MCC-Houston" and under that "FIRST MANNED LUNAR LANDING". The words NASA - MSC Houston Texas on the bottom left. Then below the person's name and the letter D in boxes. Size is approximately 2"X4".

413 is in
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posted 07-27-2010 12:53 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for 413 is in   Click Here to Email 413 is in     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Sounds like an Apollo 11 MOCR (Mission Operations Control Room) badge. Green badges were for access to the MOCR proper. Pink and white badges were for access to surrounding support rooms only.

The artwork can also be found on LRL (Lunar Receiving Laboratory) badges.

Timothy
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posted 07-27-2010 01:50 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Timothy   Click Here to Email Timothy     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thanks! Mine is white and I did go into the MOCR proper and the good old IBM 360's area, etc. Cannot remember what the "D" access gave. It is so odd looking I always wondered why none ever show up for sale as they are getting very old. Who was the artist!? Sure were some nice celebrations (lol) at times.

413 is in
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posted 07-27-2010 05:25 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for 413 is in   Click Here to Email 413 is in     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I would have thought that NASA security was fairly strict back in those days when it came to granting access to controlled areas, particularly when a given mission was underway. With that said, I'm sure exceptions were made from time to time for valid reasons.

The above picture of the access door to the MOCR is a screen capture taken from some NASA "behind the scenes" footage included on a Spacecraft Films DVD. I believe it was from Apollo 13. I have to laugh when I look at this sign with all the missing letters. The low resolution photo is hard to read but here is what it says:

GREEN
BADGES
ONLY

No eating or dr[in]king
in MOCR ex[cept]
during period[s] of
mission supp[or]t

I wonder how well the eating and drinking rule was enforced. Smoking was allowed, of course. In fact, I think it was mandatory!

The Apollo 11 MOCR badges do not come up for sale very often due to their relative rarity. I follow sales from the major auction houses (Regency, Heritage, Swann, Bonhams, Astro-Auction, etc) and eBay as well. Over the past 10 years I have only seen a small handful of these offered for sale.

As for the artwork on the badge, I remember reading somewhere that it was designed by an Apollo engineer who worked in the MOCR area.

davidcwagner
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posted 07-27-2010 07:25 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for davidcwagner   Click Here to Email davidcwagner     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
What are the values of the Apollo 11 MOCR and LRL badges? I have one of each from MSC Deputy Director George S. Trimble.

Timothy
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posted 07-28-2010 09:42 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Timothy   Click Here to Email Timothy     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by 413 is in:
The above picture of the access door to the MOCR is a screen capture taken from some NASA "behind the scenes" footage included on a Spacecraft Films DVD.
I worked in Houston '66-'70 and didn't notice that on the door (doesn't mean it was not there! lol). Have a nice booklet "MCC-H Mission Control Center" title that has 14 pages of pictures including the MOCR. Several of my people worked in the MOCR. Badges I have: Apollo 11 (one regular and one with the 11) and Apollo 9, 10, 12 and an "All Missions".

Plus programs: Ranger, Gemini Target, Atlas/Agena OAO, OGO-A, Mariner, FIRE, from Cape Canaveral and from Goddard the NASA Earth Resources Tchnoloogy Satellite and Operations Control badges. I've been sorting out the things I have after retiring last year. Started at the Cape in 1956 so getting older than dirt. Many pictures, some signatures of note but it will take me some time to catalog the items.

Thanks for the auction sites. I will look at them.

413 is in
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posted 07-29-2010 07:48 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for 413 is in   Click Here to Email 413 is in     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by davidcwagner:
What are the values of the Apollo 11 MOCR and LRL badges?
These badges do not come to market with much frequency. Therefore, it's hard to get a handle on market value. I can say that overall the market for most types of badges has been trending upward over the past 10+ years that I have been collecting.

If it helps, here are some recent sales comps for the badge types in question:

  • Apollo 11 Yellow LRL Access Badge
    • Jim McDivitt - Astro-Auction (March 2009) $975
    • Jean G. Baker - Ebay (March 2010) $557
    • H. M. (Harry) Porter - Ebay (July 2011) $325
  • Apollo 11 Green MOCR Access Badge
    • Al Alibrando (PAO) - Ebay (Feb 2010) $260
    • Fred Haise - The Space Source (Mar 2008) $2000

413 is in
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posted 07-29-2010 07:48 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for 413 is in   Click Here to Email 413 is in     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Timothy:
I worked in Houston '66-'70... Badges I have: Apollo 11 (one regular and one with the 11) and Apollo 9, 10, 12 and an "All Missions".
Sounds like a nice set of badges and, I'm sure, many great memories from working at NASA during the golden age of spaceflight!

I notice that you have an "All Missions" badge. During the early Gemini missions, access badges for the MOCR were white. It wasn't until Gemini 9 that badge colors were changed to green for MOCR access.

Here are some examples from my collection, showing how the badge styles evolved over the years from Gemini on to Apollo and then early shuttle:

Note: The first official mission that was fully conducted out of the MCC-H was Gemini 4. Gemini 3 was controlled from the Cape, and the MCC-H operated in shadow mode only. Blue-White visitor badges were issued to grant access to the MOCR during that brief period of transition.

The white Gemini "All Missions" badge was utilized for GT-4, GT-5, and GT 7/6 only. Directly following these missions, a white-colored combination Gemini and Apollo badge was used (Apollo test flights overlapped with Gemini manned missions).

The last white badge that was used for MOCR access was for the GT-8 mission. Thereafter all MOCR access badges were changed to green.

stsmithva
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posted 09-14-2011 08:07 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for stsmithva   Click Here to Email stsmithva     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Here is the laminated NASA photo ID card of Edward R. Sharp. As you can see, when this ID was issued he was the Director of Lewis (later renamed Glenn) Research Center of Cleveland, Ohio. (A recent Air & Space magazine article about the supersonic wind tunnel at Lewis mentioned Sharp.)

He had joined NASA's precursor, the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, in 1922 (!). In 1957-1958, he served on NACA's Special Committee on Space Technology, which led to the creation of NASA. In this photo of the committee members, he is sitting up front on the left, across from von Braun.

NACA was abolished, and its research centers, including Lewis, incorporated into the new agency. NASA officially opened its doors on October 1, 1958 in the old Dolley Madison House across Lafayette Square from the White House. (A year later the Mercury 7 astronauts were introduced to the public in that house.) NASA's first administrator was T. Keith Glennan.

Here is the back of Sharp's ID card. First, I find the date of birth interesting: 3/9/94, as in 1894. This is a NASA employee who was born the year the Wright brothers started repairing and selling bicycles.

Then there is the fact that this card wasn't authorized by a security officer with a stamp, but hand-signed by Administrator Glennan himself, just a month after NASA started its work.

And finally, over on the left... this is "Card Number 1", the very first ID ever issued by NASA.

413 is in
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posted 09-14-2011 10:58 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for 413 is in   Click Here to Email 413 is in     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by stsmithva:
Here is the laminated NASA photo ID card of Edward R. Sharp.
Steve, this is an incredible piece of space history! Thanks for sharing.

Neil Aldrin
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posted 10-07-2011 01:28 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Neil Aldrin     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I too have a couple (non-rare) Apollo era KSC badges, laminated with the metal grommet for the clip, however, I do not have the clips.

My question deals with the clips, what they look like up close and how they attach to the grommets. Current clips with snaps do not snap closed because of the width of the metal grommets on the badges?

Any help is appreciated!

ilbasso
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posted 10-08-2011 05:38 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for ilbasso   Click Here to Email ilbasso     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Here's one of the clips:

Neil Aldrin
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posted 10-09-2011 01:22 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Neil Aldrin     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thanks for posting those photos. I would imagine that clips like this were widely used in the 60's and 70's, so hopefully I can find a couple.

The depth on the pin in your photos shows me why the ones I'm finding will not snap closed after going through the thick metal grommet.

ilbasso
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posted 10-09-2011 03:30 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for ilbasso   Click Here to Email ilbasso     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I've seen some pictures where there are two badges hanging from the same clip - so yes, it is a relatively long pin.

David Carey
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posted 03-03-2012 05:27 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for David Carey   Click Here to Email David Carey     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
A recent eBay purchase turned out to be an interesting and perhaps favorable gamble.

Pursuant to the earlier discussion of gray/blue Apollo 11 Viewing Passes, the darker blue VIP example acquired below had Agnew’s name typed in as shown in the first image below (all images can be enlarged by clicking).

I was originally thinking the badge could be a “second” given a slight correction to the ‘s’ in ‘President’ and the eBay listing was clear about uncertainty of whether it was Agnew’s actual badge or a discarded first-try.

After examining several photos that document the VP’s A11 presence, I’m reasonably convinced that the badge was indeed worn by Agnew on launch day.

Looking at the last photo in particular where I’ve blown up part of the image showing the badge on Agnew’s jacket, the horizontal placement of the “Vice President Agnew”, the slight tilt of the typed line relative to pass edge, and the curl/curve of the plastic badge envelope are all a dead match to the eBay purchase.

While much more speculative and harder to discern given finite detail, the ‘s’ in question seems to be a perfect match as well with a slightly darker area in the typing visible in the precise location above the shadow demarcation line on the moon graphic of the badge.

Given all of the correlation in subtle aspects of typing and the notion that a typed addition would likely have some placement variation on a second attempt, I’m pretty sure we have a winner.

Feel free to weigh in with any contrary opinions; it’s just for fun and my feelings will not be hurt.


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