Space News
space history and artifacts articles

Messages
space history discussion forums

Sightings
worldwide astronaut appearances

Resources
selected space history documents

Websites
related space history websites

  collectSPACE: Messages
  Hardware & Flown Items
  [Discuss] Omega Speedmaster space watches (Page 6)

Post New Topic  Post A Reply
profile | register | preferences | faq | search


This topic is 7 pages long:   1  2  3  4  5  6  7 
next newest topic | next oldest topic
Author Topic:   [Discuss] Omega Speedmaster space watches
LM-12
Member

Posts: 1241
From: Ontario, Canada
Registered: Oct 2010

posted 01-19-2013 06:34 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for LM-12     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by 328KF:
I seem to recall during TV transmissions on the return flight of 16 that Duke still had a Speedmaster on his wrist, although the resolution is not good enough to determine if it is the failed one or a spare.
If this 16mm footage is transearth, then it must be a spare — or borrowed.

LM-12
Member

Posts: 1241
From: Ontario, Canada
Registered: Oct 2010

posted 01-23-2013 06:36 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for LM-12     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by 328KF:
... and Dave Scott's was reported to have failed on EVA 2.
It looks like Dave Scott's Speedmaster was still working at Station 7 on EVA-2. Photo 12235 taken at Station 7 shows the crystal is still intact, so the watch must have failed at some point after that.

Ashy
Member

Posts: 156
From: Preston, England
Registered: Mar 2004

posted 01-25-2013 10:14 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ashy   Click Here to Email Ashy     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I'm still not sold on the Apollo 17 watch. Bought the Apollo 15 anniversary watch a few months ago instead and as one would expect, is great.

I'm holding off still on the A17. I like wearing my watches on a daily basis, as oppose to locking them away and it just seems too difficult to read. Any views?

Larry McGlynn
Member

Posts: 844
From: Boston, MA
Registered: Jul 2003

posted 01-25-2013 03:30 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Larry McGlynn   Click Here to Email Larry McGlynn     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Ashy, I did receive my Omega A-17 Speedmaster just prior to the Apollo 17 40th Anniversary party at the Naval Aviation Museum in Pensacola. Omega gave Gene his personal watch at the Saturday night dinner. It was fun to compare watches with him.

You are correct in that it is a bit difficult to read the dial in low light. That issue is offset by the fact that it is like wearing a Robbins Medallion on your wrist. Omega's silversmith's did a great job recreating the image. The sterling silver dial in the image of the A-17 mission insignia is beautiful.

I have #72 of 1972 watches that were issued. Gene has #1972.

Ashy
Member

Posts: 156
From: Preston, England
Registered: Mar 2004

posted 01-29-2013 05:54 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ashy   Click Here to Email Ashy     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Larry, thanks for that. You wont remember this but I once compared 'speedies' with you at London once at an Autographica, when you were wearing your 'extra special' Appllo 11 40th watch! Your watch trumped mine... easily!!

I was going to see my jeweler today who has an Apollo 17 watch in, but have not made it yet due to other commitments. It because it is so different from other anniversary watches that makes it so appealing yet it's the same reason I'm hesitant!!

The agony of choice!!!!

Larry McGlynn
Member

Posts: 844
From: Boston, MA
Registered: Jul 2003

posted 01-29-2013 01:29 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Larry McGlynn   Click Here to Email Larry McGlynn     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Ashy, Omega made a design change for the some of the 35th and 40th anniversary watches. The ASTP watch with a Gibeon meteorite face was one that I loved. I figured that was my last Omega until Gene showed my pictures on the A-17 40th. They did a very good job in engraving the face. It was pointed out to me that the face has better relief than a Robbins Medallion. Only difference is that the face is thinner and it didn't fly.

Take a look at it. See what you think.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 30714
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 04-05-2013 11:45 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Omega's new commercial...

TLIGuy
Member

Posts: 23
From: Virginia
Registered: Jul 2013

posted 12-06-2013 09:04 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for TLIGuy   Click Here to Email TLIGuy     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The final piece of my Apollo 17 Speedmaster set up arrived just in time. The Timely bracelet calendar was the last missing piece of the puzzle.

I only need to tack down one more calendar to have one for each Apollo mission.

41 years ago on December 7th 1972, this was strapped to the wrists of the last men to head off to the moon.

Ashy
Member

Posts: 156
From: Preston, England
Registered: Mar 2004

posted 01-18-2014 02:27 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ashy   Click Here to Email Ashy     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Anyone heard any news of an Apollo 11 45th anniversary watch this year?

LM-12
Member

Posts: 1241
From: Ontario, Canada
Registered: Oct 2010

posted 03-24-2014 11:55 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for LM-12     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
This photo shows several Omega Speedmaster watches in storage where the qualification testing was done. Can you match names to those numbers?

TLIGuy
Member

Posts: 23
From: Virginia
Registered: Jul 2013

posted 03-26-2014 03:26 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for TLIGuy   Click Here to Email TLIGuy     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Ashy:
Anyone heard any news of an Apollo 11 45th anniversary watch this year?
Here you go... Hot off the press.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 30714
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 03-27-2014 01:53 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
collectSPACE
45 past: New Omega Speedmaster watch marks Apollo 11 45th anniversary

Forty-five years ago this July, astronaut Buzz Aldrin stepped out onto the lunar surface and — in addition to becoming the second man to walk on the moon — became the first to wear a watch on another world.

Now, four-and-a-half-decades later, the Swiss watchmaker behind the moonwalker's timepiece is honoring the historic occasion with a new version of the chronograph.

Omega on Wednesday (March 26) revealed online its new Speedmaster Apollo 11 45th Anniversary Limited Edition wristwatch that "commemorates the first lunar landing and celebrates its link to the iconic chronograph that was part of the adventure."

Glint
Member

Posts: 827
From: New Windsor, Maryland USA
Registered: Jan 2004

posted 03-27-2014 12:22 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Glint   Click Here to Email Glint     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
For the sake of accuracy, Omega's marketing verbosity aside regarding Sedna (Omega's name for its rose-gold alloy used in the watch's hands), (90377) Sedna is not "the dwarf planet that crosses Neptune's orbit." Sedna's perhelion (76 AU) lies at well over twice the distance of Neptune's aphelion (30AU) so there is very little chance of any orbits crissing or crossing.

Officially Sedna's not classified as a dwarf planet as well. The IAU currently recognizes only five. However's Sedna, known as a trans-Neptunian objects, is considered to be one of the most massive half dozen or so discovered to date.

Just wanted to dial down some of the the hype.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 30714
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 03-27-2014 12:32 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Glint:
Sedna is not "the dwarf planet that crosses Neptune's orbit."
I edited the article earlier this morning to correct this (it now reads, "named after a dwarf planet that is beyond Neptune's orbit.")

As for whether or not Sedna is a dwarf planet, though not official, it is popularly called such and as this wasn't a scientific paper, I went with the vernacular usage.

Chariot412
Member

Posts: 108
From: Lockport, NY, 14094
Registered: Jun 2011

posted 03-27-2014 01:38 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Chariot412   Click Here to Email Chariot412     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Did I miss it? Are there any references to Apollo 11 on the watch itself?

TLIGuy
Member

Posts: 23
From: Virginia
Registered: Jul 2013

posted 03-27-2014 02:11 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for TLIGuy   Click Here to Email TLIGuy     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Nope... I think that is what is disappointing for me as a collector. While beautiful, the watch seems to have no real connection to the mission. I can't find the image now but the case back carries the familiar moon watch verbiage and nothing similar to the other mission related Speedmasters that have special engravings.

minipci
Member

Posts: 250
From: London, UK
Registered: Jul 2009

posted 03-28-2014 05:58 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for minipci     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Just noticed that on the 45th anniversary edition there appear to be three divisions (two dividing lines) between the minute markers on the main dial, rather than five on the standard watch (four dividing lines).

So you can only time accurately to 0.333 seconds rather than 0.2 seconds. Although I must admit that I doubt that I could tell the difference with the decline in my eyesight.

328KF
Member

Posts: 929
From:
Registered: Apr 2008

posted 03-29-2014 12:07 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for 328KF   Click Here to Email 328KF     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
On the watch blogs, some attendees at Baselworld have posted pics of the new iteration of the Speedmaster X-33, called the "Skywalker." As some here probably know, the Gen 2 has been off the public market for years, and many wondered if it would ever come back or be updated.

Omega has not made a formal announcement yet... they tend to spread these out during the days of the big Basel show, but here are the pics.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 30714
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 03-29-2014 12:13 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Very interesting. According to watch-insider.com:
For the moment the watch is officially certified by ESA, the European Space Agency, later NASA will also certify it.
The site also notes the price as 4900 CHF or about $5,525 US.

Ashy
Member

Posts: 156
From: Preston, England
Registered: Mar 2004

posted 03-29-2014 05:05 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ashy   Click Here to Email Ashy     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I'm not that impressed with the Apollo 11 45th anniversary watch. It looks nice (I suppose) but my first impression is that it looks 'cheap'.

I don't think I'll be getting this when it's released in June.

moorouge
Member

Posts: 1845
From: U.K.
Registered: Jul 2009

posted 04-03-2014 01:10 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for moorouge   Click Here to Email moorouge     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Robert Pearlman:
The site also notes the price as 4900 CHF or about $5,525 US.

The price in the UK will be just a few pounds shy of £4000 though that might be reduced a bit with some haggling.

Incidentally, for a watch to be sent back to the factory for a clean and service takes between 6 to 8 weeks and will cost £400.

SpaceAholic
Member

Posts: 3276
From: Sierra Vista, Arizona
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 04-03-2014 12:01 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for SpaceAholic   Click Here to Email SpaceAholic     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I hope this latest version will be more reliable then its predecessor and also will support battery swap-out without having to send the watch back to the factory.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 30714
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 04-03-2014 12:09 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by SpaceAholic:
...will support battery swap-out without having to send the watch back to the factory.
That's not likely, if it is going to remain "flight qualified for space missions."

When I last sent off mine for a battery change, Omega explained that it was the pressurized case — required for spaceflight — that precluded in-store servicing.

SpaceAholic
Member

Posts: 3276
From: Sierra Vista, Arizona
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 04-03-2014 12:18 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for SpaceAholic   Click Here to Email SpaceAholic     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Will be interesting to see how the on-orbit crew get their watches to the factory ...perhaps Omega has factored shuttle service to the ISS into the watch's price structure.

Solar recharging would have been a nice feature.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 30714
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 04-03-2014 12:29 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The same way they do now? They land with them and have them serviced between flights.

I have only had to have my battery replaced once in the nine years I've owned my Gen 2 X-33. I don't think NASA (or anyone else) is planning a three-year mission yet (and if they are, watch repair is the least of their concerns). But, if push comes to shove, then there's always the Don Pettit technique:

SpaceAholic
Member

Posts: 3276
From: Sierra Vista, Arizona
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 04-03-2014 12:40 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for SpaceAholic   Click Here to Email SpaceAholic     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I had the Gen 1...battery life elapsed after a little more then a year. Frequent use of the alarm and the LCD may have been a factor.

Looks also like the backs of the Gen 1 and Gen 2 had different attachment methods - the Gen 1 back could not be removed with a screw driver as shown in the above video (required a special tool).

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 30714
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 04-03-2014 01:01 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Ah, that may explain it. The Gen 2 doesn't need a special tool to remove the case back, but does require a factory apparatus to repressurize it.

SpaceAholic
Member

Posts: 3276
From: Sierra Vista, Arizona
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 04-03-2014 01:15 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for SpaceAholic   Click Here to Email SpaceAholic     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I see whats different... in the video there is no secondary case back. Thinking back (been a while) both the Gen 1 and Gen 2 had screws but once the outer back was removed there was a second inner cover.

TLIGuy
Member

Posts: 23
From: Virginia
Registered: Jul 2013

posted 04-03-2014 02:12 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for TLIGuy   Click Here to Email TLIGuy     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I own, and have flown, with both the Generation 1 and 2 X-33s for years and more than one occasion have had to replace the battery on a deployment.

Both the Generation 1 and 2 are the exact same watch with minor cosmetic changes to the Gen 2. There is also a later updated movement module that gets replaced during service if needed. Both have screw down case backs and a movement cover that the alarm contact needs to touch so it functions correctly.

Cosmetically the Gen 1 has polished pushers and bezel. It also had a standard style crown which malfunctioned quite often resulting in what is referred to as "collapsing crown." It was resolved with the new crown on the Gen 2 which also allowed for the easier use with gloved hands by adding the rings. The Gen 2 also now has the brushed pushers and bezel.

I don't want to step on any toes but the X-33 does not have a pressurized case. When servicing the watch with Omega, or any other good watch maker, they do a pressure test to make sure it is water resistant for the depth specified by the make and model. Are you sure you are not confusing the two? It's unlikely any Omega AD can do a pressure check unless they are servicing watches in house. Maybe that is what was meant by they (service center) had the equipment to do so. I'll check with my watch gurus about this just to make sure I don't have to eat my words.

One of the best pilot watches ever made in my opinion. My Gen 2...

SpaceAholic
Member

Posts: 3276
From: Sierra Vista, Arizona
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 04-03-2014 03:36 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for SpaceAholic   Click Here to Email SpaceAholic     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by TLIGuy:
...and a movement cover that the alarm contact needs to touch so it functions correctly.
Scroll to ~00:45 in the video... the inner movement cover seems to be missing when the outer cover is removed.

TLIGuy
Member

Posts: 23
From: Virginia
Registered: Jul 2013

posted 04-03-2014 04:46 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for TLIGuy   Click Here to Email TLIGuy     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I don't want to clutter up the thread with more images but both the models have the movement cover. If you enlarge the video to full screen you will see both edges of the case back and movement cover floating off as one piece. The movement cover has a grayish pad on the inside and you catch a small glimpse of it as it floats off.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 30714
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 04-03-2014 05:07 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by TLIGuy:
Are you sure you are not confusing the two?
It's possible; it has been a number of years since I have had my Gen 2 serviced, so I may be misremembering the conversation.

Coincidentally, Chris Ferguson tweeted this today about his Gen 2:

My awesome Omega watch keeps mission time and has been running since STS -135 launch. Well it stopped today... at 1000 days. Wow!

Hart Sastrowardoyo
Member

Posts: 2583
From: Toms River, NJ
Registered: Aug 2000

posted 04-15-2014 09:12 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Hart Sastrowardoyo   Click Here to Email Hart Sastrowardoyo     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
"Moonwatch Only / The Ultimate Omega Speedmaster Guide" (costing USD $350) will be previewed at the TimeCrafters show May 16-18 in New York City.

LM-12
Member

Posts: 1241
From: Ontario, Canada
Registered: Oct 2010

posted 06-02-2014 02:12 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for LM-12     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
A running Omega Speedmaster can be seen at 31:15 in this 16mm footage of the Heat Flow and Convection Experiment on Apollo 17.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 30714
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 06-02-2014 02:18 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Well it stopped today... at 1000 days.
I had a chance to ask Chris Ferguson about this and he clarified, his Omega X-33 didn't break, rather its Mission Elapsed Time counter stopped as it reached 1,000 days. He had hoped to keep it running as a reminder of how long it had been since he last was in space, but it apparently reached its limit.

Larry McGlynn
Member

Posts: 844
From: Boston, MA
Registered: Jul 2003

posted 06-02-2014 07:35 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Larry McGlynn   Click Here to Email Larry McGlynn     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by LM-12:
This photo shows several Omega Speedmaster watches in storage where the qualification testing was done. Can you match names to those numbers?
Based on the numbers shown in photo, the following numbers flew.
  • #75 Flown on Apollo 14 and worn by Shepard
  • #76 Flown on ASTP and worn by Stafford
  • #77 Flown on Apollo 14 and worn by Mitchell
The rest that are shown are not flown.

LM-12
Member

Posts: 1241
From: Ontario, Canada
Registered: Oct 2010

posted 06-02-2014 11:41 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for LM-12     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thanks for that, Larry. It looks like there are a lot of watches in that container.

Larry McGlynn
Member

Posts: 844
From: Boston, MA
Registered: Jul 2003

posted 06-03-2014 07:05 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Larry McGlynn   Click Here to Email Larry McGlynn     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
There are a lot of watches in the container. The extra unflown watches were either given or sold in the 1980's to various museums including the Kansas Cosmosphere. The unflown watches were used (with permission) as gifts.

Some of the unflown watches pop up today at auction from time to time. Including this one at Sotherby's.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 30714
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 07-17-2014 10:55 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Here's Buzz modeling the new Apollo 11 45th anniversary Omega Speedmaster:

nasamad
Member

Posts: 1949
From: Essex, UK
Registered: Jul 2001

posted 07-17-2014 01:00 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for nasamad   Click Here to Email nasamad     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Was Bart Sibrel (or BS for short!) the photographer? It looks like good ol Buzz is lining up a left hook.


This topic is 7 pages long:   1  2  3  4  5  6  7 

All times are CT (US)

next newest topic | next oldest topic

Administrative Options: Close Topic | Archive/Move | Delete Topic
Post New Topic  Post A Reply
Hop to:

Contact Us | The Source for Space History & Artifacts

Copyright 1999-2014 collectSPACE.com All rights reserved.


Ultimate Bulletin Board 5.47a





advertisement