Space News
space history and artifacts articles

Messages
space history discussion forums

Sightings
worldwide astronaut appearances

Resources
selected space history documents

Websites
related space history websites

Forum:Free Space
Topic:Total solar eclipse: Nov. 13, 2012 (last until 2015)
Want to register?
Who Can Post? Any registered users may post a reply.
About Registration You must be registered in order to post a topic or reply in this forum.
Your UserName:
Your Password:   Forget your password?
Your Reply:


*HTML is ON
*UBB Code is ON

Smilies Legend

Options Disable Smilies in This Post.
Show Signature: include your profile signature. Only registered users may have signatures.
*If HTML and/or UBB Code are enabled, this means you can use HTML and/or UBB Code in your message.

If you have previously registered, but forgotten your password, click here.

Max QLooking at the NASA Solar Eclipse page, I read with interest that the longest eclipse within the 5000 year calendar to be 7 minutes, 29 seconds of totality with the shortest being just 9 seconds. The page shows the longer eclipse to be much closer to but not on the equator and the short one to be in the polar region.

I understand the relationship between location of the path of totality and length of eclipse. I was wondering what the maximum theoretical time for an eclipse (Totality) is?

Glint
quote:
Originally posted by Max Q:
Looking at the NASA Solar Eclipse page, I read with interest that the longest eclipse within the 5000 year calendar to be 7 minutes, 29 seconds of totality with the shortest being just 9 seconds.

It is possible to observe even shorter total eclipses. The shortest duration would be 0 seconds and occurs during a hybrid total/annular eclipse at the point(s) of transition between the two types along the central path.

There is one such eclipse coming next year. At sunrise the moon covers only 99.9% of the sun and observers would see a 4 second annular eclipse. One minute later, 101% of the sun is covered and observers at that point of the central path would see a 3 second total solar eclipse. In between is a transition point where a 0 second total solar eclipse would be seen.

The magnitude of the eclipse grows (due to the curvature of the earth) and at maximum totality lasts 1 minute 40 seconds.

Here is a table of the event times for the 2013 eclipse.

quote:
Originally posted by Robert Pearlman:
Total solar eclipse: Last until 2015

Technically, what it is, is the last chance to view the totality eclipsed sun until 2013.

Contact Us | The Source for Space History & Artifacts

Copyright 1999-2014 collectSPACE.com All rights reserved.


Ultimate Bulletin Board Version 5.47a





advertisement