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Author Topic:   SpaceX's Starlink internet satellite network
Robert Pearlman
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posted 05-11-2019 09:11 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Starlink is SpaceX's Internet communication satellite constellation development project. Two prototype "Tintin" satellites were launched in February 2018.

The first production-design satellites are slated for launch as soon as Wednesday, May 15. From Elon Musk on Twitter:

First 60 SpaceX Starlink satellites loaded into Falcon fairing. Tight fit.

These are production design, unlike our earlier Tintin demo sats. Much will likely go wrong on first mission. Also, six more launches of 60 sats needed for minor coverage, 12 for moderate.

More details on day of launch, currently tracking to Wednesday.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 05-15-2019 01:08 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
SpaceX release
Starlink Mission

SpaceX is targeting Wednesday, May 15 for the launch of 60 Starlink satellites from Space Launch Complex 40 (SLC-40) at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida. SpaceX's Starlink is a next-generation satellite network capable of connecting the globe, especially reaching those who are not yet connected, with reliable and affordable broadband internet services.

The launch window opens at 10:30 p.m. EDT on May 15, or 2:30 UTC on May 16, and closes at 12:00 a.m. on May 16, or 4:00 UTC.

A backup launch window opens on Thursday, May 16 at 10:30 p.m. EDT, or 2:30 UTC on May 17, and closes at 12:00 a.m. on May 17, or 4:00 UTC.

Falcon 9's first stage for this mission previously supported the Telstar 18 VANTAGE mission in September 2018 and the Iridium-8 mission in January 2019. Following stage separation, SpaceX will attempt to land Falcon 9's first stage on the "Of Course I Still Love You" droneship, which will be stationed in the Atlantic Ocean.

Approximately one hour and two minutes after liftoff, the Starlink satellites will begin deployment at an altitude of 440 kilometers. They will then use onboard propulsion to reach an operational altitude of 550 kilometers.

SpaceX designed Starlink to connect end users with low latency, high bandwidth broadband services by providing continual coverage around the world using a network of thousands of satellites in low Earth orbit. To manufacture and launch a constellation of such scale, SpaceX is using the same rapid iteration in design approach that led to the successes of Falcon 1, Falcon 9, Falcon Heavy, and Dragon. As such, Starlink's simplified design is significantly more scalable and capable than its first experimental iteration.

With a flat-panel design featuring multiple high-throughput antennas and a single solar array, each Starlink satellite weighs approximately 227 kilograms, allowing SpaceX to maximize mass production and take full advantage of Falcon 9's launch capabilities. To adjust position on orbit, maintain intended altitude, and deorbit, Starlink satellites feature Hall thrusters powered by krypton.

Designed and built upon the heritage of Dragon, each spacecraft is equipped with a Startracker navigation system that allows SpaceX to point the satellites with precision. Importantly, Starlink satellites are capable of tracking on-orbit debris and autonomously avoiding collision. Additionally, 95 percent of all components of this design will quickly burn in Earth's atmosphere at the end of each satellite's lifecycle — exceeding all current safety standards — with future iterative designs moving to complete disintegration.

This mission will push the operational capabilities of the satellites to the limit. SpaceX expects to encounter issues along the way, but our learnings here are key to developing an affordable and reliable broadband service in the future.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 05-15-2019 10:08 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
From SpaceX on Twitter:
Standing down today [May 15] due to excess upper level winds. Teams are working toward tomorrow's backup launch window, which opens at 10:30 p.m. EDT.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 05-16-2019 08:11 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
From SpaceX on Twitter:
Standing down to update satellite software and triple-check everything again. Always want to do everything we can on the ground to maximize mission success, next launch opportunity in about a week.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 05-20-2019 11:55 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
From SpaceX on Twitter:
Now targeting May 23 for launch of Starlink from Pad 40 in Florida.

Liembo
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posted 05-20-2019 12:15 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Liembo   Click Here to Email Liembo     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
What do those initial Starlink satellites look like when deployed? I can't find any images.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 05-23-2019 10:36 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
From SpaceX on Twitter:
Successful deployment of 60 Starlink satellites confirmed!

damnyankee36
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posted 05-24-2019 02:16 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for damnyankee36   Click Here to Email damnyankee36     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Liembo:
What do those initial Starlink satellites look like when deployed? I can't find any images.

I've been wondering that too ever since the photo of the stack in launch configuration was released.

I count 30 modules. About half look a little different than the others. To have 60 onboard I'm guessing they must be roughly the shape of a triangle or something similar to nest against each other along the centerline of the stack.

I also suppose they could be flat when deployed but I wonder if they unfold or otherwise deploy into a different configuration.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 05-24-2019 04:31 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Here is a brief animation, sourced from SpaceX's Starlink website, which shows the deployed configuration.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 05-31-2019 02:48 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
SpaceX update
We continue to track the progress of the Starlink satellites during early orbit operations. At this point, all 60 satellites have deployed their solar arrays successfully, generated positive power and communicated with our ground stations.

Most are already using their onboard propulsion system to reach their operational altitude and have made initial contact using broadband phased array antennas.

SpaceX continues to monitor the constellation for any satellites that may need to be safely deorbited. All the satellites have maneuvering capability and are programmed to avoid each other and other objects in orbit by a wide margin.

Also, please note that the observability of the Starlink satellites is dramatically reduced as they raise orbit to greater distance and orient themselves with the phased array antennas toward Earth and their solar arrays behind the body of the satellite.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 09-02-2019 11:35 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The European Space Agency (ESA) needed to adjust a satellite's orbit to avoid a collision with a Starlink satellite. From Twitter:
For the first time ever, ESA has performed a "collision avoidance manoeuvre" to protect one of its satellites from colliding with a "mega constellation."

This morning, ESA's Aeolus Earth observation satellite fired its thrusters, moving it off a collision course with a SpaceX satellite in their Starlink constellation. Experts in our space debris team calculated the risk of collision between these two active satellites, determining the safest option for Aeolus would be to increase its altitude and pass over the SpaceX satellite.

The manoeuvre took place about half an orbit before the potential collision. Not long after the collision was expected, Aeolus called home as usual to send back its science data – proving the manoeuvre was successful and a collision was indeed avoided.

It is very rare to perform collision avoidance manoeuvres with active satellites. The vast majority of ESA avoidance manoeuvres are the result of dead satellites or fragments from previous collisions. In 2018, ESA performed 28 collision avoidance manoeuvres across its fleet.

These avoidance manoeuvres take a lot of time to prepare - from determining the future orbital positions of all functioning spacecraft, to calculating the risk of collision and potential outcomes of different actions. As the number of satellites in orbit increases, due to "mega constellations" such as Starlink comprising hundreds or even thousands of satellites, today's "manual" collision avoidance process will become impossible. ESA is preparing to automate this process using AI (Artificial Intelligence). From the initial assessment of a potential collision to a satellite moving out of the way, automated systems are becoming necessary to protect our space infrastructure.

SpaceAholic
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posted 09-03-2019 07:11 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for SpaceAholic   Click Here to Email SpaceAholic     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
..because Spacex refused to act:
According to Holger Krag, head of the Space Debris Office at ESA, the risk of collision between the two satellites was 1 in 1,000 – ten times higher than the threshold that requires a collision avoidance maneuver. However, despite Aeolus occupying this region of space nine months before Starlink 44, SpaceX declined to move their satellite after the two were alerted to the impact risk by the U.S. military, who monitor space traffic.

"Based on this we informed SpaceX, who replied and said that they do not plan to take action," says Krag, who said SpaceX informed them via email – the first contact that had been made with SpaceX, despite repeated attempts by Krag and his team to get in touch since Starlink launched. "It was at least clear who had to react. So we decided to react because the collision was close to 1 in 1,000, which was ten times higher than our threshold."

As to why SpaceX refused to move their satellite, that is not entirely clear (the company did not respond to a request for comment).

Robert Pearlman
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posted 09-03-2019 11:17 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
SpaceX statement
Our Starlink team last exchanged an email with the Aeolus operations team on August 28, when the probability of collision was only in the 2.2e-5 range (or 1 in 50k), well below the 1e-4 (or 1 in 10k) industry standard threshold and 75 times lower than the final estimate. At that point, both SpaceX and ESA determined a maneuver was not necessary.

Then, the U.S. Air Force's updates showed the probability increased to 1.69e-3 (or more than 1 in 10k) but a bug in our on-call paging system prevented the Starlink operator from seeing the follow on correspondence on this probability increase — SpaceX is still investigating the issue and will implement corrective actions.

However, had the Starlink operator seen the correspondence, we would have coordinated with ESA to determine the best approach with their continuing with their manuever or our performing a maneuver.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 11-11-2019 08:19 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
SpaceX is targeting Monday (Nov. 11) at 9:56 a.m. EST (14:56 GMT), for launch of 60 Starlink satellites from Space Launch Complex 40 (SLC-40) at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida.

denali414
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posted 01-06-2020 12:09 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for denali414   Click Here to Email denali414     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thought really interesting SpaceX will be the largest satellite operator and internet supplier after this launch (potential $30 billion per year). Had not realized this into connectivity.
The potential reward for the company, however, is sizable. With its burgeoning constellation, SpaceX has surged ahead of OneWeb and several other competitors seeking to develop low-latency Internet from space. With its highly reusable Falcon 9 rocket first stage, SpaceX also has a decided cost advantage in terms of getting its satellites into space. Capturing just 3 percent of the global Internet market could bring in about $30 billion in revenue.

Monday night's launch attempt will occur on a Falcon 9 first stage that has flown three times previously, in September 2018 (Telstar 18 VANTAGE), January 2019 (Iridium-8), and May 2019 (the first experimental Starlink mission). After launching, the first stage will land on the “Of Course I Still Love You” droneship offshore in the Atlantic Ocean. Another vessel, “Ms. Tree,” will attempt to recover a payload fairing half. The Starlink satellites themselves will deploy at 61 minutes into the mission, at an altitude of 290km.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 01-29-2020 07:47 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
SpaceX is targeting Wednesday (Jan. 29) at 9:09 a.m. EST (1409 GMT) for its fourth launch of Starlink satellites from Space Launch Complex 40 (SLC-40) at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 01-29-2020 09:18 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
From SpaceX, via Twitter:
Successful deployment of 60 Starlink satellites confirmed!

Robert Pearlman
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posted 02-17-2020 10:01 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
SpaceX's fifth launch of Starlink satellites lifted off Monday (Feb. 17) at 10:05 a.m. EST (1505 GMT) from Space Launch Complex 40 (SLC-40) at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida.

The launch was a success, though the first stage missed landing on the drone ship. From SpaceX, via Twitter:

Successful deployment of 60 Starlink satellites confirmed!

crash
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posted 02-25-2020 11:24 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for crash   Click Here to Email crash     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Has anyone been able to capture any good images of the latest Starlink satellites that were launched on the 17th Feb '20?

I was sitting there watching the shop the other night, mid-Atlantic, when a voice comes over the radio "Can anyone else see those lights?" I look up and there was a long line of a dozen or more lights slowly transitting the sky, heading to the Eastern horizon. I had watched for a while before I remembered to try and grab a photo. Phones are not ideal but this was what I got. I have tweaked it to brighten the stars and satellites.

Robert Pearlman
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SpaceX is targeting Sunday, March 15, 2020 at 9:22 a.m. EDT, or 13:22 UTC, for its sixth launch of Starlink satellites, which will lift off from Launch Complex (LC-39A) at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

Update: The launch was aborted at T-0. From SpaceX:

Standing down today; standard auto-abort triggered due to out of family data during engine power check. Will announce next launch date opportunity once confirmed on the range.

Robert Pearlman
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From SpaceX:
Targeting Wednesday, March 18 at 8:16 a.m. EDT, 12:16 UTC, for Falcon 9's launch of Starlink from LC-39A in Florida.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 03-18-2020 07:33 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The launch was a success, though the first stage (making its fifth flight) failed to be recovered. From SpaceX, via Twitter:
Successful deployment of 60 Starlink satellites confirmed.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 04-19-2020 10:23 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Starlink satellites as seen from the International Space Station on April 13, 2020.

Skythings
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posted 04-21-2020 07:56 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Skythings   Click Here to Email Skythings     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Last Sunday evening around 22:30 hours I had to go outside to close the large sliding door on my garage I I had left open during the day. It had been awhile since the weather in my area was suitable for going outside to stargaze. Venus was blazing high in the western sky so I took this opportunity to spend some time out watching overhead.

After about 10 minutes I noticed a dim satellite overhead moving west to east. At the same time another satellite moving south to north crossed at the same point overhead. You don't see that too often. Then to my surprise I spotted another dim satellite moving west to east in exactly the same orbit as the one ahead of it. Then another one and then another. I counted 14 birds in very loose formation. I had never seen anything like that in my life. That was pretty cool.

Then I remembered something about lines of satellites upsetting astronomers. I went inside and Googled and learned of the Starlink project.

One thing I love doing is going outside on a nice night and watching the sky. Yes I count the overhead satellites and streaks of incoming debris burning in the upper atmosphere.

When I read that SpaceX was planning on launching 12,000 of these satellites I was upset and worried that we are about to loose our natural night skies which I cherish. Then I learned of other projects and in total there could be over 42,000 similar satellites orbiting our Earth in the near future. I was quite upset learning this. The night sky will look like Los Angeles freeways at night with that many satellites. I know SpaceX is talking about trying to make future satellites less reflective.

As much as I think SpaceX is great, I'm sorry I find this project to be sky pollution.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 04-22-2020 08:51 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
SpaceX is targeting Wednesday, April 22 at 3:30 p.m. EDT (1930 GMT), for its seventh launch of Starlink satellites. Falcon 9 will lift off from Launch Complex 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

David C
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posted 04-22-2020 01:53 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for David C     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Skythings:
As much as I think SpaceX is great, I'm sorry I find this project to be sky pollution.
I agree 110%. I don't know where SpaceX gets off, deciding that they have the self-appointed right to pollute everybody's sky. I'm also curious to know if there turns out to be effects on migrating wildlife. I think some theories still reckon that astronavigation is a technique employed by some species. I wonder if they even considered that? So far as I'm concerned, humans have screwed up the natural world quite enough without adding this unnecessary project to the list.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 04-22-2020 02:29 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I agree there are valid concerns about preserving the night sky; concerns that the astronomical communities are rightly voicing.

That said, SpaceX "gets off" by being licensed by the FAA and FCC to do so, just as other companies have been licensed to deploy satellite constellations in the past and in the future. It wasn't too long ago that astronomers were concerned about Iridium satellite flares, but then they became something enthusiasts took delight in seeing.

Granted, the planned number of Starlink satellites are far more than Iridium ever deployed, or the total number of active satellites presently in orbit, but such is the march of progress.

(I'll also point out that using an online forum to label a service as unnecessary may undermine your argument given that Starlink is primarily targeted at providing internet access to under-served areas where other means of broadband connection are not practical or possible.)

Robert Pearlman
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posted 04-22-2020 03:02 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
From SpaceX, via Twitter:
Successful deployment of 60 Starlink satellites confirmed.

Skythings
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posted 04-23-2020 08:59 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Skythings   Click Here to Email Skythings     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Robert Pearlman:
That said, SpaceX "gets off" by being licensed by the FAA and FCC to do so, just as other companies have been licensed to deploy satellite constellations in the past and in the future.
Just because two USA government agencies license SpaceX does not make this OK with the rest of the world who is affected by their night skies being ruined by a USA company. I'm not talking about from an astronomical position. I'm talking about stepping outside into nature and not being subjected to a multi-directional river of artificial moving lights constantly flowing overhead when this is implemented fully. This is not progress in my opinion.

The argument that SpaceX and several other companies with future plans to offer internet to Africa and other area's around to world, who they call the "un-connected," is noble. The reality is many parts of the world do not have electricity and computers nor incomes to take advantage of the internet which SpaceX will be charging a fee to use to the majority of the world. I expect affluent nation consumers will subsidize the un-connected places in the world combined with partnerships with Facebook and Google. We all know how much more we need them in our lives and that nothing is free.

I would like to personally challenge Elon Musk and SpaceX and any other satellite provider, please make all future satellites invisible to the naked eye. Then everyone is happy.

David C
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posted 04-23-2020 11:17 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for David C     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Robert Pearlman:
That said, SpaceX "gets off" by being licensed by the FAA and FCC to do so...

I'll also point out that using an online forum to label a service as unnecessary may undermine your argument...


OK, I consider the FAA/FCC process grossly inadequate because of:
  1. the already mentioned international nature of the consequences.
  2. my own cynicism about the competence of the FAA to handle even its basic core tasks never mind this. I'll just say 737 MAX and leave it there.
  3. the fact that neither body really makes much effort to study possible other implications outside of their own relatively narrow mandates. That's not their fault, it's how the system is organised, I'm saying that system isn't fit for purpose.
On the broadband thing, I see it as evidence for quite the reverse. The internet's being getting on just fine for years without Starlink, it doesn't "need" it now. No broadband? Well, plenty of people in developed countries aren't connected to main sewers, or gas mains etc, their choice to live where they do.

Not all development is progress.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 04-28-2020 08:39 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Elon Musk said April 27 that he hopes to test a new way to reduce the brightness of the company's Starlink satellites on the next launch, reports SpaceNews.
In a briefing to a committee working on the next astrophysics decadal survey, Musk said the experimental "VisorSat," along with a new approach for orienting Starlink satellites as they raise their orbits, should address concerns raised by astronomers that the Starlink constellation could interfere with their observations.

"Our objectives, generally, are to make the satellites invisible to the naked eye within a week [of their launch], and to minimize the impact on astronomy, especially so that we do not saturate observatory detectors and inhibit discoveries," Musk said...

The new approaches won't address the issue of brightness of existing Starlink satellites, but Musk said their lifetime is limited. He estimated the initial generation of satellites will be deorbited in about three to four years to make way for improved satellites.

Skythings
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posted 04-29-2020 06:39 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Skythings   Click Here to Email Skythings     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
That's excellent news.

David C
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posted 04-29-2020 09:08 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for David C     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
That's a slow but definite step in the right direction towards fixing something they shouldn't have done in the first place. Perhaps other organisations will think a little harder in the future.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 04-29-2020 11:56 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
SpaceX has now posted to its website a more thorough description of its discussion with the National Academy of Sciences.
SpaceX is launching Starlink to provide high-speed, low-latency broadband connectivity across the globe, including to locations where internet has traditionally been too expensive, unreliable, or entirely unavailable. We also firmly believe in the importance of a natural night sky for all of us to enjoy, which is why we have been working with leading astronomers around the world to better understand the specifics of their observations and engineering changes we can make to reduce satellite brightness.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 06-03-2020 04:54 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
SpaceX is targeting Wednesday, June 3, 2020, at 9:25 p.m. EDT, 1:25 UTC on June 4, for its eighth launch of Starlink satellites. Falcon 9 will lift off from Space Launch Complex 40 (SLC-40) at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 06-03-2020 09:27 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
From SpaceX, via Twitter:
On this mission, we are launching the first Starlink satellite with a deployable visor to block sunlight from hitting the brightest spots of the spacecraft.

Falcon 9's first stage has landed on the Just Read the Instructions droneship – the first orbital class rocket booster to successfully launch and land five times!

Successful deployment of 60 Starlink satellites confirmed.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 06-13-2020 05:48 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
SpaceX on Saturday (June 13) launched its ninth Starlink mission, deploying 58 Starlink satellites. The Falcon 9 lifted off at 5:21 a.m. EDT (0921 GMT) from Space Launch Complex 40 at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida.

The mission marked SpaceX's first SmallSat Rideshare Program launch with the inclusion of three SkySats for Planet. From SpaceX (via Twitter):

Successful deployment of 58 Starlink satellites confirmed.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 06-26-2020 08:46 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
SpaceX is targeting Friday, June 26 at 4:18 p.m. EDT, 20:18 UTC, for launch of its tenth Starlink mission, which will include 57 Starlink satellites and two satellites from BlackSky, a Spaceflight customer. Falcon 9 will lift off from Launch Complex 39A (LC-39A) at Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

Update: SpaceX has scrubbed today's (June 26) launch attempt.

Standing down from today's Starlink mission; team needed additional time for pre-launch checkouts, but Falcon 9 and the satellites are healthy. Will announce new target launch date once confirmed on the Range.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 07-08-2020 08:28 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
From SpaceX (via Twitter):
Falcon 9 is vertical on LC-39A ahead of our tenth Starlink mission, targeted for Wednesday (July 8) at 11:59 a.m. EDT.
Update: SpaceX has scrubbed today's (July 8) launch attempt.
Standing down from today's mission due to weather; proceeding through the countdown until T-1 minute for data collection. Will announce a new target launch date once confirmed on the Range.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 07-11-2020 07:16 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
SpaceX live video
SpaceX is targeting Saturday, July 11 at 10:54 a.m. EDT, 14:54 UTC, for launch of its tenth Starlink mission.
Update: SpaceX has scrubbed today's (July 11) launch attempt.
Standing down from today's launch of the tenth Starlink mission to allow more time for checkouts; team is working to identify the next launch opportunity. Will announce a new target date once confirmed with the Range.


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Ultimate Bulletin Board 5.47a





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