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  Go, Flight: Podcast celebrating unsung heroes

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Author Topic:   Go, Flight: Podcast celebrating unsung heroes
Rick
Member

Posts: 373
From: Yadkinville, NC
Registered: Jun 2000

posted 10-08-2017 01:58 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Rick   Click Here to Email Rick     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Just wanted to let everyone know about Go, Flight: The Podcast. I've had a lot of fun with it so far, and I believe the content I've been able to provide has been superb.
  • Episode 1 features my friend and mentor, Milt Heflin.

  • Episodes 2-5 introduce listeners to Alan Bean, the person. We discuss his childhood and the influence of his mother of his life and career, his "extreme" introversion, college, early Navy career and his application to the astronaut office, among a good many other things.

  • Episode 6 is probably my favorite so far. Former astronaut David Hilmers was in NORTH Korea as Hurricane Harvey began its approach toward his home in Houston. Given the times in which we live, David has an extraordinary viewpoint on the nation and its people.

  • Episode 7 is the most recent posted so far, and includes the first of three installments of an extraordinary interview that legendary Flight Director Glynn Lunney conducted with former mission control Retro officer John Llewellyn. John, a veteran of the Korean War, gives a harrowing account of the Battle of the Chosin Reservoir that listeners won't soon shake.
To support production of the podcast, I've created a Patreon campaign in which Patrons can receive some very nice rewards for their support.
  • For as little as $1 per month, the first 25 Patrons receive a free download of the Go, Flight audiobook, courtesy of University of Nebraska Press and Audible. Several still remain.

  • $4 a month will get you a very nice full-size Mission Control film poster, courtesy of Haviland Digital and Gravitas Ventures.

  • $5 a month means a download of the Mission Control film, again courtesy of Haviland Digital and Gravitas Ventures.

  • $7 a month will bring you a signed copy of the Go, Flight paperback, courtesy of, well, me.

  • $12 a month will net the poster AND the film download AND the book.
To give the podcasts a listen and for more information on the Patreon campaign, please visit here.

mode1charlie
Member

Posts: 999
From: Honolulu, HI
Registered: Sep 2010

posted 10-08-2017 06:22 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for mode1charlie   Click Here to Email mode1charlie     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thanks, Rick - happy to support this eminently worthy project!

Rick
Member

Posts: 373
From: Yadkinville, NC
Registered: Jun 2000

posted 10-08-2017 07:05 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Rick   Click Here to Email Rick     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thank you, Burke! I really do appreciate it. I will get you the link to the audiobook first thing tomorrow. I hope you enjoy it!

capoetc
Member

Posts: 2029
From: Plano TX (USA)
Registered: Aug 2005

posted 10-08-2017 07:21 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for capoetc   Click Here to Email capoetc     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Once you become a patron, does the Patreon app allow you to download and listen to the podcasts, or do you have to listen from a comnputer terminal?

Rick
Member

Posts: 373
From: Yadkinville, NC
Registered: Jun 2000

posted 10-08-2017 07:52 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Rick   Click Here to Email Rick     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
No, I would send you a promo code and instructions to download the audiobook from Audible. You could listen on any portable device you wish, or your computer, just like any other audiobook.

Rick
Member

Posts: 373
From: Yadkinville, NC
Registered: Jun 2000

posted 10-09-2017 12:16 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Rick   Click Here to Email Rick     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Burke, your reward has been processed. I sent you a message with the promo code and download instructions for the Go, Flight audiobook through Patreon. Enjoy!

mode1charlie
Member

Posts: 999
From: Honolulu, HI
Registered: Sep 2010

posted 10-09-2017 05:54 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for mode1charlie   Click Here to Email mode1charlie     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thanks, Rick — the audiobook downloaded just fine, but I still can't figure out how to get the podcasts. I pasted the URL into iTunes and so it's there, but no podcasts appear in the feed. Any insights?

Rick
Member

Posts: 373
From: Yadkinville, NC
Registered: Jun 2000

posted 10-09-2017 07:21 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Rick   Click Here to Email Rick     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Each of the episode links are available here or go directly to SoundCloud to listen. An app is available to listen on mobile devices.

The podcast should be available on iTunes and other platforms later this month.

Rick
Member

Posts: 373
From: Yadkinville, NC
Registered: Jun 2000

posted 10-10-2017 10:10 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Rick   Click Here to Email Rick     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The eighth episode of Go, Flight: The Podcast has been posted. It features the second installment of Glynn Lunney's interview with John Llewellyn, and Jerry Bostick returns to remember his friend, and to say goodbye to another, "Broadway Jay" Greene.

You can check it out here.

Rick
Member

Posts: 373
From: Yadkinville, NC
Registered: Jun 2000

posted 10-19-2017 01:43 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Rick   Click Here to Email Rick     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Episode 9 has been posted with the third and final installment of the John Llewellyn interview. John holds NOTHING back concerning Scott Carpenter's Mercury flight, the Apollo 11 lunar landing or the time that Glynn Lunney asked him to bring the crew of Apollo 7 down in the middle of a hurricane!

You can check it out here.

Rick
Member

Posts: 373
From: Yadkinville, NC
Registered: Jun 2000

posted 10-25-2017 10:07 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Rick   Click Here to Email Rick     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Episode 10 has been posted, and it features a great conversation with seven-time space shuttle astronaut Jerry Ross. Listen in here.

Show notes:

  • Jerry and his wife Karen didn't have any serious damage to their home during Hurricane Harvey, but many of their neighbors weren't so fortunate.

  • A veteran of several mission trips with his church, Jerry pitched in to help with recovery from Harvey before going on an extended trip in Europe.

  • The outpouring of assistance in Texas and Florida in the wake of Hurricanes Harvey and Irma reminded Jerry of the help NASA received following the loss of the Space Shuttle Columbia.

  • Jerry remembers the very tentative start between the American and Russian space programs, and how both parties put aside their differences.

  • Jerry talks about why he entered the astronaut program as a mission specialist and not as a pilot.

  • Although he hasn't made use of it in quite some time, Jerry does hold a private pilot's license. Time and money kept him from flying privately during his time as an astronaut.

  • Jerry discusses Tinker Toys in Space — the EASE/ACCESS experiment — on STS-61B. It's a precursor to construction methods on the International Space Station.

  • At one point, STS-61B was slated to fly in the ill-fated Challenger slot.

  • The flight is also Jerry's first, and as he exited the airlock to begin his first spacewalk, he forced himself not to let out a yell of excitement.

  • Jerry grew up with the space race between the United States and Soviet Union, and he kept extensive scrapbooks along the way. That led him to learn about Purdue University in his homestate of Indiana, and in the fourth grade, he decided that he was going to attend the school and become an engineer. The goal of becoming an astronaut evolved over time.

  • Which spacewalk was his most fulfilling? EVERY spacewalk was fulfilling!

  • When you go outside at night and see the International Space Station pass by overhead, just remember … Jerry Ross was a part of its very first assembly mission.

  • Jerry gives some advice to Ham radio operators hoping to get in touch with the ISS.

  • Jerry discusses his time in the Air Force, and the work he did as an engineer in flight tests of everything from the T-33 to B-1 bomber.

  • Houston's mission control team was always in charge during Jerry's classified Department of Defense STS-27 flight. There were, however, a team of air force flight controllers being trained for launches that were scheduled to take place out of Vandenburg.

  • For years, rumors have persisted that Jerry did an EVA during the flight of STS-27 to repair the military satellite that had been deployed, yet the information remains classified. He filed a Freedom of Information Act request when working on his book, which was denied.

  • During the launch of STS-27, Atlantis sustained damage to more than 700 tiles ... and the crew knew about at least some of it. Hear Jerry give his harrowing account of his return to Earth... and what might have been.

Rick
Member

Posts: 373
From: Yadkinville, NC
Registered: Jun 2000

posted 11-02-2017 01:52 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Rick   Click Here to Email Rick     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Les Hanks served for many years as a quality control inspector, technician and industrial engineering and safety engineer on the Space Shuttle at Kennedy Space Center in Florida. After an absence of a few years, Les is back at KSC and working on the Space Launch System program.

I first met Les when former Busch Series driver Ashton Lewis and I took a tour of KSC. Ashton got to go on board one of the Shuttles in the OPF... and I got to stick my head in the hatch and see the potty!

Les is a big NASCAR fan, and, obviously, I have a big interest in all things NASA. We've been friends ever since. Les joined me for this week's episode of the podcast, and our conversation pretty much ran the gamut! Listen in on our chat here. Show Notes:

  • After serving as an F-16 crew chief in the United States Air Force, Les planned to go to work for one of the major airlines. An on-the-spot offer to work on the Shuttle, however, changed the course of his career.

  • Les describes the exquisite attention to detail Shuttle technicians gave to their work, and how it all paid off on launch day.

  • Although he was assigned to a particular Orbiter Processing Facility, Les' work in all reality was spread across each facility and all of the vehicles in the Shuttle fleet.

  • The astronauts who flew on board the machines Les and his co-workers labored on made it a point to thank the Shuttle workforce for their expertise. After all, it was their lives on the line if something went wrong.

  • Les remembers where he was and what he was doing February 1, 2003 — the day Columbia went down.

  • After the tragedy, Les copes with the emotions of the accident and the uncertainties of the program itself while serving on the reconstruction team at the Cape.

  • Forced into a decision to leave the Shuttle workforce by the looming end of the program, Les takes a job with Siemens Wind Power. He describes the melancholy feeling of leaving KSC for the last time, and stopping to take a picture of the Vehicle Assembly Building in his rear-view mirror.

  • After working with aircraft in the Air Force and, of course, the Space Shuttle for so long, the new job turned out to be quite an adjustment for Les.

  • Les' story does not end there, however. Earlier this year, he returned to work at Kennedy Space Center on the Space Launch System program and once again sees the VAB through the windshield of his car ... instead of the rear-view mirror.

  • Les gives his take on the relationship between NASA and companies like Space X.

  • The rebirth of the Space Coast...
Also, I still have a few "Go, Flight" audiobook downloads and paperbacks; as well as "Mission Control" film posters and downloads available through our Patreon campaign. Please check that out!

Rick
Member

Posts: 373
From: Yadkinville, NC
Registered: Jun 2000

posted 11-10-2017 10:15 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Rick   Click Here to Email Rick     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
In this week's very special program, the podcast's Patreon supporters submitted their questions for the one and only John Aaron. You can listen to the episode here. Show notes:
  • John Aaron ALWAYS felt the need to learn, even after he was a NASA veteran. Simulations, after all, kept him and many others humble. He considered it his job to come up with answers when trouble struck.

  • The SCE to Aux story, in John's own words.

  • It takes a question from fellow NASA legend Chris Kraft at John's retirement party for the momentous events of the Apollo 12 launch to really sink in.

  • Do we go to the moon or Mars next?

  • What would John consider to be his proudest moments at NASA? Here's a hint ... strangely enough, NONE of them involve being the star of Mission Control: The Unsung Heroes of Apollo!

  • How did John figure out what took priority when coming up with Apollo 13's power-up procedures?

  • Jack Swigert gets it right, even in the worst of conditions.

  • John Aaron's favorite job at NASA? EECOM. Any surprise there?

  • If Apollo 9 had experienced an explosion on one of its oxygen tanks, would it have been in more trouble than Apollo 13 due to its sometimes spotty communications? Maybe ... maybe not.

  • If Gerry Griffin was "this close" to calling an abort during the launch of Apollo 12, did such a thing ever enter into John's thinking? Noooooooooooooooooo.

  • After Rick gets thrown under the bus by HIS fitness coach, John talks about some of the mentors he's had over the years at NASA.

  • As hard as it is to believe, John was in awe of his surroundings when he first joined NASA and nearly left the agency. His parents ... and his wife ... convinced him to stay put. He credits them with changing the course of his life.

  • John calls wife Cheryl his career and moral compass.

  • John discusses teamwork and collaboration with his good friend Jim Kelly, and others within the control team.

  • The pros and cons of pinto beans versus Boston baked beans, John Aaron and Arnie Aldrich style.

  • Here's an idea. How about Patreon supporters start paying by the number of times I start a question or comment with the word "Now"? Trust me, for every one that makes it into the podcast, five get edited out. I'd be RICH!

  • John Aaron goes through his problem-solving methodology in general, and has some comments on the first few moments of the Apollo 13 crisis in particular that you DO NOT want to miss.

  • We say goodbye to Dick Gordon...

  • Be sure and stick around until the very end for a special treat.

Rick
Member

Posts: 373
From: Yadkinville, NC
Registered: Jun 2000

posted 11-16-2017 10:19 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Rick   Click Here to Email Rick     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Mark Craig, director of the extraordinary documentary film "The Last Man on the Moon," joins us for a great conversation about his career and the legendary Gene Cernan. You can listen to the episode here:
  • This is our first truly international episode, as Mark joins us from his home in England!

  • A British kid who loved James Bond films? Who would've ever guessed?

  • He drew all the time as a child, and once he graduated from art college, he eventually specialized in motion graphics for BBC 4. That turned into directing small live-action pieces, and he was on his way.

  • Born in 1959, he got caught up in the space program like so many other children of the time.

  • One night, his father took him into the garden, pointed at the moon and told him that two men were walking on its surface. Little did Mark know that he would meet several moonwalkers, and get to know one particularly well.

  • Mark discusses his interest in Formula 1 racing, and how documentaries on drivers Jackie Stewart, Graham Hill and Jim Clark helped pave the way for Last Man on the Moon with Mark Stewart Productions.

  • Mark isn't quite up to speed on NASCAR... yet.

  • The first contact between Mark Craig and Mark Stewart was a literally a cold call, Craig contacting Stewart and introducing himself, basically looking for a job. What's the worst that Stewart could've said? No?

  • Before Mark had finished Gene Cernan's book, he'd emailed the publisher to get in touch with the former astronaut in an attempt to get the ball rolling on a documentary. They met for the first time in London just a couple of months later, in the summer of 2007.

  • It was that December, when Mark met some of Gene's friends and family in Washington DC, that he began to understand who the former astronaut was later in life.

  • Gene's ex-wife Barbara, daughter Tracy and longtime friend Fred Baldwin add amazing life and perspective to the film, and that's just the way Mark wanted it.

  • Suggestion Number One for working with Gene Cernan? Be on time!

  • Mark had NEVER met a moonwalker as the elevator doors slid open at the appointed meeting time with Gene... and there stood Gene AND Alan Bean!

  • Gene Cernan and sound engineer Crispin Larratt, a match made in Heaven... or not!

  • The amount of time Mark spent with Gene... and the memories Gene shared... allowed the director to get to know his subject quite well, and better than many of his other projects.

  • David Fairhead edits Last Man on the Moon before going on to direct Mission Control, and he and Mark experience some tough give-and-take moments in determining the film's final cut.

  • Mark's toughest cut from the film...

  • Mark's reactions to the first public viewings of Last Man on the Moon were more of a professional sort, rather than emotional.
NOTE: Thanksgiving is next week in the United States, so there will be no new episode of Go, Flight: The Podcast, but we shall return the week after!

mode1charlie
Member

Posts: 999
From: Honolulu, HI
Registered: Sep 2010

posted 11-16-2017 06:41 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for mode1charlie   Click Here to Email mode1charlie     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Great, I look forward to listening.

Rick, do you know when these podcasts will be available on iTunes? It's somewhat challenging for me to listen to them by any other means. Thanks.

Rick
Member

Posts: 373
From: Yadkinville, NC
Registered: Jun 2000

posted 11-16-2017 06:43 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Rick   Click Here to Email Rick     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I made arrangements for that to happen today. I really do apologize for the inconvenience ... the devil really IS in the details!

Rick
Member

Posts: 373
From: Yadkinville, NC
Registered: Jun 2000

posted 12-05-2017 08:46 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Rick   Click Here to Email Rick     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
From the Jim Crow-era Mississippi Delta to the EECOM console in the MOCR, Bill Moon brings his amazing story to this episode of the podcast. Listen to the episode here. Show notes:
  • Bill's dad immigrated from China to California, where he picked fruit and worked as a cook in the mines before settling in Mississippi.

  • At just 10 years old, Bill was working long hours in his family's store. He also helped out at a neighboring shop, where he was paid the princely sum of $5 a day. At such a young age, he was entrusted to take deposits of thousands of dollars to the bank.

  • Bill did learn to work the system, and traded box tops from his family's store for bicycles, BB guns and roller skates!

  • Although he grew up in the darkest days of the late 1950s Jim Crow era in Mississippi, Bill says he never experienced any overt racism.

  • Bill's acceptance continues at Mississippi State, where he is a charter member of the school's Acacia social fraternity.

  • After going to work for McDonnell Aircraft out of college, Bill goes to Houston to visit his brother and submits another application to NASA. This time, he accepts the offer he receives.

  • The tracking ship Bill is on stays out at sea so long following the Gemini 8 crisis that it runs out of food, and the crew is forced to throw fishing lines over the side. The ship then overshoots its port by a couple of hours.

  • The evolution of Bill's career takes him back to Houston, where he first works in the Staff Support Room before training "side saddle" to EECOM Sy Liebergot during the flight of Apollo 14.

  • Bill gets his chance to shine as lead EECOM during the final two lunar landings, Apollos 16 and 17. Yet while Bill might have been the lead EECOM, it was John Aaron who worked the launches. Wonder why?!?

  • Where Bill learned from John Aaron and Sy Liebergot, he was able to return the favor and serve as a mentor to others later on in his career, including none other than Go, Flight co-author Milt Heflin.

  • As Bill transitioned into management, he did miss operations in the front room.

  • Although Bill was the first minority to work in the MOCR, it's not something upon which he dwelt or took advantage of.

  • Bill says he's not a very humble guy, when in fact, he is.

  • Bill discusses his work as president of the Apollo Flight Operations Association.

Rick
Member

Posts: 373
From: Yadkinville, NC
Registered: Jun 2000

posted 12-12-2017 03:56 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Rick   Click Here to Email Rick     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Host Rick Houston is joined by Jerry Bostick, whose legendary NASA career spanned literally from the Mercury to Space Shuttle eras. Best known as the chief of the Flight Dynamics Branch – otherwise known as The Trench – Jerry played a crucial role in the research and writing phases of the book Go, Flight, and he also stars in the documentary film Mission Control. Listen to the episode here. Show notes:
  • Jerry gives an update on the broken hip he suffered recently. He’s progressing very nicely, thank you very much.

  • He says he’s being a good patient … but asking the doctors a lot of questions.

  • In a great moment, Jerry lets his daughter Kristi know just how much he appreciates the help she’s been during his recovery.

  • Given the results of an aptitude test he took in school, Jerry could've joined his father in the funeral home business or become an engineer. The story gets laughs in virtually every single public showing of the Mission Control film.

  • A couple once stopped Jerry and asked for directions, and as he watched them drive off, the young man couldn't help but marvel at their beautiful car and wonder where they might be going.

  • Jerry's own path was headed for Washington DC, and stints as a page and doorman in the US House of Representatives.

  • There's a photo of a young Jerry with Richard Nixon in the Mission Control film. Here's the story behind that amazing shot.

  • How about a new contest ... how many times during an episode will Rick begin a question with the word "Now ...?" And that's just the times he doesn't edit out.

  • A chance meeting with Chris Kraft changes the course of Jerry's career ... and life.

  • Jerry begins work in the brand-new world of mission control, and relies on a strong work ethic and sense of honesty in order to survive early in his career.

  • The people who made mistakes during simulations and then tried to talk their way out of it were the ones who didn't last very long. Chris Kraft saw to that.

  • Chris Kraft's motto? To err is human ... but it's against my policy.

  • Along with Kraft, Jerry also considers Glynn Lunney an early mentor.

  • When Mercury Retro controller Carl Huss had a non-life-threatening heart attack, Jerry stepped into the void. It was another moment that changed his career.

  • Alan Shepard might've been the Icy Commander to some ... and maybe even Jerry, if the truth be known ... but he didn't let it show during an infamous incident leading up to the flight of Gemini 3. it leads to what Jerry calls a "rocky relationship" between the two NASA legends, until they patched things up during training for the flight of Apollo 14.

  • During Gemini, Jerry becomes a FIDO ... essentially the quarterback of the Flight Dynamics Branch. The move required him to switched divisions, from Mission Planning to Flight Control, not to mention an on-the-spot decision by Kraft.

  • The Trench ... they were a proud bunch.

  • Jerry was one of the three people first called to Chris Kraft's office to be informed of the momentous plans for Apollo 8. Over a single weekend, he shook off his initial incredulity to figure out that it could be done from a flight dynamics standpoint.

  • Jerry calls the Christmas Eve Genesis reading one of the most emotional experiences of his life, and from the tone of his voice, it's clear that he's not exaggerating.
NOTE: Jerry will return in the next episode to discuss Apollo 11 ... Apollo 13 ... the other Apollo 13 ... and more!

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