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Author Topic:   Natl Museum of U.S. Air Force: Shuttle Trainer
Robert Pearlman
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posted 02-28-2012 08:35 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
National Museum of the U.S. Air Force release
National Museum USAF to receive retired NASA space shuttle crew compartment trainer

A retired NASA space shuttle crew compartment trainer is expected to arrive this summer at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force.

The CCT is a high-fidelity representation of the space shuttle orbiter crew station that was used primarily for on-orbit crew training and engineering evaluations.

It was in this trainer that astronauts learned how to operate many of the orbiter sub-systems in more than 20 different classes. All Air Force astronauts in NASA's shuttle program trained in the CCT.

The crew module of the CCT consists of a flight deck and a mid-deck, and contains components such as panels, seats and lights visible to or used by the flight crew. Non-functional switches, connections, guards and protective devices all have the same characteristics, operating force, torque and movement as a real space shuttle.

The museum is currently working with NASA to package the CCT for airlift to the museum via NASA's Super Guppy cargo aircraft, which carries outsized loads such as missile and rocket components. After arrival, technicians will offload the CCT and place it on interim display in the Cold War Gallery, before later moving it to a new Space Gallery in the planned fourth building.

According to the director of the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force, retired Lt. Gen. Jack Hudson, the CCT will be a great addition to the museum.

"When the CCT exhibit is completed, it will allow the public to have an up-close and personal look into the cockpit and mid-deck areas of a shuttle and learn how astronauts trained for their missions," Hudson said.

"We also plan to build a full-scale mock-up of the payload bay and develop other new exhibits with an emphasis on science, technology, engineering and math to further illustrate the rich history of the Air Force's space programs and vital Air Force, NASA and aerospace industry partnerships."

The new Space Gallery, where the CCT will eventually reside, is a part of a multi-phase, long-term expansion plan and will house the museum's growing space collection.

The gallery will include a Titan IV launch vehicle; Mercury, Gemini and Apollo spacecraft; and many recently retired NASA artifacts such as a nose cap assembly, landing gear strut and a variety of astronaut equipment.

In addition, a range of satellites and related items will showcase the Air Force's vast reconnaissance, early warning, communications and other space-based capabilities. Other new exhibits will be developed to showcase Air Force technologies with many unique characteristics in design, propulsion, payload capacity, human factors, range, speed, communication, and operating environment.

One of the unique features of the fourth building will be the creation of dedicated spaces for learning. Three "Learning Nodes" will provide a unique environment for lectures and demonstrations, as well as extensions of the exhibit experience.

These 60-seat "gallery classrooms" will allow staff to facilitate new science, technology, engineering and math experiences, while guest scientists and engineers from Air Force organizations, the aerospace industry, and area colleges and universities will be invited to share their expertise. Multimedia presentations will introduce students to air and space missions and the men and women responsible for their execution. When the nodes are not in use for scheduled programs, multimedia presentations will captivate public audiences.

The Air Force Museum Foundation, an IRS 501(c)(3) organization chartered to assist the National Museum of the United States Air Force with the development and expansion of facilities, is in the process of raising the funds to meet the growing requirements of the museum.

Currently, $38 million has been secured by the Foundation for the fourth building project, which is expected to cost an estimated $48 million. The fourth building will house the Space Gallery, Presidential Aircraft Gallery and Global Reach Gallery featuring cargo and tanker aircraft.

The National Museum of the United States Air Force is located on Springfield Street, six miles northeast of downtown Dayton.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 07-20-2012 03:13 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
National Museum of the U.S. Air Force video release

Since the space shuttle's retirement in 2011, NASA has been finding new homes across the country for the retired space crafts. This video takes you to Houston to check out another piece of equipment that was just as vital to NASA's space program.

JSC01
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posted 07-31-2012 01:53 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for JSC01     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Not sure, but I believe that the Crew Compartment Trainer may be on it's way to Ohio. Last week it was completely wrapped (photo below), and it's now out of the Building. Congrats to our friends in Dayton, a very special piece of space history is heading your way!

Robert Pearlman
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posted 07-31-2012 02:03 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The CCT won't be leaving Houston for at least a few more weeks.

In the meantime, it is being moved by truck to the Light Manufacturing Facility near Ellington Field, where it will wait until the Super Guppy is done delivering the final segment of the Full Fuselage Trainer (FFT) to Seattle on Aug. 9.

It will then be mounted onto a specialized adapter for its flight to Dayton.

The CCT's delivery to the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force is expected in late August or early September, at the earliest.

Fra Mauro
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posted 07-31-2012 02:04 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Fra Mauro   Click Here to Email Fra Mauro     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
What are they going to do with that empty space at the JSC?

Robert Pearlman
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posted 07-31-2012 02:07 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The area vacated by the shuttle trainers in the Space Vehicle Mockup Facility is being used for Orion and commercial crew trainers, including the medium and low fidelity Orion modules and SpaceX payload trainers already in the building.

JSC01
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posted 07-31-2012 06:45 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for JSC01     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Here is a nice article (PDF) about all the changes happening in the JSC vehicle mockup facility JSC (page 4). Great to see that as the shuttle trainers vacate, exciting work will continue in the facility.

kr4mula
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posted 08-01-2012 11:16 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for kr4mula   Click Here to Email kr4mula     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
While I've seen the Super Guppy flying quite a few times during my Houston days, I'm sure it's arrival at the NMUSAF will draw quite a lot of attention from the locals. I'll have to bring my camera to work the day it arrives.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 08-14-2012 02:56 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
This time-lapse video from July 2012 shows the Crew Compartment Trainer as it is prepared for transport from Johnson Space Center to the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force.

canyon42
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posted 08-15-2012 08:45 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for canyon42   Click Here to Email canyon42     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The local Dayton TV news said last night that museum officials are expecting arrival next Wednesday (the 22nd) or Thursday. Here is a Dayton Daily News article with the same info.
The crew compartment training module is expected to arrive Aug. 22 or Aug. 23, said Sarah Swan, an Air Force museum spokeswoman.

...construction on the new Air Force museum hangar is expected to begin next year and open in 2014. It will house the Space Galley, Presidential Aircraft Gallery and Global Reach Galley. Officials have raised more than $38 million of the $48 million for needed to pay for the expansion.

canyon42
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posted 08-18-2012 08:10 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for canyon42   Click Here to Email canyon42     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Another Dayton Daily News story updating the expected arrival time of the shuttle trainer at the Air Force Museum as 4:00 p.m. Wednesday, August 22, weather permitting.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 08-20-2012 12:45 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Per the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force on Facebook:
The Crew Compartment Trainer was moved to Ellington Field yesterday and loaded onto the Super Guppy this morning.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 08-23-2012 12:25 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
collectSPACE
NASA space shuttle trainer lands at U.S. Air Force museum

A space shuttle mockup that was used to train astronauts, including more than 75 members of the U.S. Air Force, has landed in Dayton, Ohio, where it will go on display at the world's largest and oldest military aviation museum.

The Space Shuttle Crew Compartment Trainer 1 (CCT-1), which was used for more than three decades at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston, was flown onboard the agency's Super Guppy cargo plane to Wright-Patterson Air Force Base on Wednesday (Aug. 22).

Once offloaded from the aircraft on Thursday, CCT-1 will be moved into the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force (NMUSAF), which is located at the base. The museum plans to display the trainer inside its Cold War Gallery until its new Space Gallery inside a planned fourth building is ready late next year.

Hart Sastrowardoyo
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posted 08-23-2012 02:12 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Hart Sastrowardoyo   Click Here to Email Hart Sastrowardoyo     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
It may have trained more than 75 members of the USAF, but where did the MSEs, most of whom were Air Force, train?

Robert Pearlman
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posted 08-23-2012 04:23 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
According to Michael Cassutt, in an article he wrote for Spaceflight magazine in 1989 (found online here):
In addition to valuable exposure to shuttle systems at Rockwell International's flight systems laboratory in nearby Downey, California, the original programme relied heavily on a schedule of monthly, week-long visits by the 13 MSEs to various military satellite contractors. This proved to be unworkable and the contractor visits were reduced in favour of vists to other Air Force installations as well as the NASA Johnson and Marshall Space Centers.
So, that would have been this mockup, which underwent its own recent move.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 08-23-2012 04:35 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
From the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force (on Facebook):
The CCT is now unwrapped and on display in the Cold War Gallery.

dabolton
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posted 08-24-2012 03:02 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for dabolton   Click Here to Email dabolton     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Did they land the Super Guppy on the runway next to the museum or truck it over from the main Wright-Pat air field? I wondered if that strip was still active or not.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 08-24-2012 03:08 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
They landed at the museum:

kr4mula
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posted 08-27-2012 07:32 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for kr4mula   Click Here to Email kr4mula     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by dabolton:
Did they land the Super Guppy on the runway next to the museum or truck it over from the main Wright-Pat air field? I wondered if that strip was still active or not.

The Museum's airstrip (the old Wright Field strip) is officially inactive (you'll see the big "X"s painted on it from the air), but the museum uses it on special occasions for fly-ins (like the Doolittle Raiders earlier this year) and for bringing in aircraft that are joining the museum's collection.

dabolton
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posted 08-27-2012 09:30 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for dabolton   Click Here to Email dabolton     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Had they received a shuttle, could they have landed it on that strip? I'm guessing runway length and overall vehicle weight would have forced a landing at the main base.

kr4mula
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posted 08-28-2012 12:42 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for kr4mula   Click Here to Email kr4mula     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Landing the SCA with the shuttle at the NMUSAF was the subject of some debate and was mentioned (by me, among others) during the cS debates on where the retired shuttles should go. The final determination by the museum was that the SCA could land just fine, but the runway was a bit short of NASA's requirements for the 747 to take off again. The runway length is within its capabilities (the SCA is nicely overpowered when empty), but didn't have enough margin of safety. It would've required some sort of waiver on NASA's part.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 09-06-2012 12:11 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
National Museum of the U.S. Air Force release
Officials re-install Crew Compartment Trainer interior items at National Museum of the U.S. Air Force

Officials with Team Raytheon based at Johnson Space Center's Space Vehicle Mockup Facility have teamed-up with the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force's Restoration staff to re-install interior items on the Crew Compartment Trainer (CCT-1).

The interior items, which include seats, lockers and monitors, were removed and transported to the museum in advance by truck in order to reduce the weight of the CCT-1 during its flight on NASA's Super Guppy aircraft.

Above: Team Raytheon mechanical engineer Rob Evans reinstalls items inside the Crew Compartment Trainer on Sept. 6, 2012. It will take several days to repopulate the interior of the CCT.

According to Team Raytheon Engineer Clayton Hamm, reinstalling the interior items on the CCT-1 has kind of been like putting together a giant puzzle.

"First, you have to fully evaluate it and locate all of the pieces and then proceed in a methodical manner so that the pieces are brought into the trainer at the right time in order to make them all fit," said Hamm. "Once everything is organized, things tend to move along smoothly, but once in a while something will surprise you or require extra time to install."

Assisting Hamm has been a team of restoration staff led by Restoration Specialist Nick Almeter, who has over-seen the project since the CCT-1 arrived at the museum.

"Everything has come together really well, and it has been great to have the engineers from Team Raytheon and the Space Vehicle Mockup Facility here to assist us," Almeter said. "They have a wealth of knowledge about the CCT-1, so it certainly makes our job that much easier."

Even after the re-installation is complete, work on the CCT-1 exhibit will continue. Plans call for the museum to build a full-scale mock-up of the payload bay and develop other new exhibits with an emphasis on science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) programs. When completed, the CCT-1 exhibit will allow the public to look into the cockpit and mid-deck areas of a shuttle and learn how astronauts trained for their missions.

These surrounding exhibits will contain additional items that NASA plans to ship to the museum, including the main/nose landing gear wheel and brake assembly; nose cap assembly; photographic equipment; primary thruster; rotational hand controller and mid-deck sleep station. Other uniform items such as an inflight jacket, cooling vest, and an in-suit drink assembly bag have already been received.

Although a firm completion date for the full exhibit is yet to be determined, the CCT-1 itself, along with a display detailing future plans including a video documenting the trainer's preparation and delivery, will be available on Sept. 29.

JSC01
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posted 09-06-2012 03:10 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for JSC01     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I'm a bit curious about: "the public to look into the cockpit and mid-deck areas...". It won't be great viewing of the flight deck in through the aft windows. The mid-deck does not have windows at all. How will they do it? I can't tell from the graphic, but are they going to open it up somehow?

Robert Pearlman
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posted 09-29-2012 09:24 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
National Museum of the U.S. Air Force release
Astronauts, community leaders welcome Crew Compartment Trainer to National Museum of the U.S. Air Force

NASA Astronauts Michael Good and Michael Foreman visited the National Museum of the Air Force during a private event to formally introduce the first shuttle Crew Compartment Trainer (CCT-1) to military and community officials and preview the next steps for the exhibit.

The event marked the debut of a new kiosk, which contains additional information about the trainer, including graphics and a mini- documentary detailing how the CCT-1 was used, its arrival at the museum and future exhibit plans.

As the event began, Foreman reflected back on the many hours he spent in NASA's three crew compartment trainers as he prepared for space missions.

"I've spent 400 - 500 hours in these trainers so it evokes all kinds of great memories," Foreman said. "These trainers were great for actually strapping in and getting ready for launch, and now people will get to see up-close where we trained for space shuttle missions."

Good, who served for 25 years in the Air Force, said he couldn't think of a better home for the trainer to inspire the next generations of scientists and engineers.

"I really love air museums and I remember coming here with my family as a kid, and it is one of the things that inspired me to study aerospace engineering and to get into this business," Good said.


Photo credit: NMUSAF/Don Popp

Above: NASA Astronaut Michael Good discusses the capabilities of NASA's first shuttle Crew Compartment Trainer at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force in Dayton, Ohio, on Sept.28, 2012.

Good also spoke about how valuable the CCT-1 was to the shuttle program and the reassurance it provided the astronauts.

"People sometimes ask me if I was scared sitting on top of that rocket prior to launch, and I can honestly tell you that I was not scared," said Good. "The reason I was not scared is because I was so well trained, and this mockup was a big part of that."

Future exhibit plans will start with Display Dynamics Inc. of Clayton, Ohio, which was recently selected to reproduce a full-scale mock-up of a NASA shuttle payload bay, engine and tail sections and a dedicated educational area.

These pieces of the exhibit, along with visitor observation and access structures, are scheduled to be completed by September 2013. The museum will continue to populate the exhibit with additional artifacts, such as satellites, along with items obtained from NASA, including space gear, hardware and other equipment, through early 2014.

During construction of the exhibit, visitors will be able to view the CCT-1 in the Cold War Gallery. When completed, the exhibit will allow the public to look into the cockpit and mid-deck areas of a shuttle and learn how astronauts trained for their missions.

The museum's director, retired Lt. Gen. Jack L. Hudson, concluded the event by expressing his thanks to all those in attendance and is looking forward to the exhibit's completion.

"The vision is grand here and we're on a pathway to do this," said Hudson. "This will be an enormous addition to the museum as the CCT-1's exhibit capability grows over time and will help us continue to tell the Air Force story to the American public as well as motivate, inspire and educate our youth towards the Air Force and science, technology, engineering and math."

In addition, three other CCT-1 exhibit contracts were recently awarded to add further content to the display. A contract to build five reproduction space suits representing the space shuttle and Gemini programs was awarded to David Clark Company, Inc., of Worcester, Mass., in the amount of $175,000.

A contract for science, technology, engineering and math learning node elements, including two space shuttle landing simulators and 10 touch-screen computers was awarded to Historic Space Systems of Danville, Ohio, in the amount $170,400.

Finally, a contract to develop fourteen 1/32-scale models of U.S. space launch vehicles representing an historical overview of U.S. Air Force and NASA programs, and one full-scale model of the Explorer 1 satellite was awarded to ProTek Models LLC, of Rancho Cucamonga, Calif., in the amount of $70,900. The space launch vehicle models will include a Jupiter C, Mercury-Redstone, Mercury-Atlas, Gemini, Titan II, Thor-Agena A, Titan IIID, Atlas-Centaur, Saturn IB, Saturn V, Delta II, Titan 4B, Atlas V, and a Delta IV Heavy, along with a space shuttle with a "full stack" of launch vehicle elements.

John McGauley
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posted 04-20-2013 06:29 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for John McGauley   Click Here to Email John McGauley     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I got a chance to visit the Space Shuttle Crew Compartment Trainer today at the National Museum of the US Air Force in Dayton, Ohio. Thought some of my fellow cS members might enjoy seeing it. I posted a public album to Facebook, so you should be able to see it. But if you can't (and anyone wants to see it!) I'll post them online elsewhere.

JSC01
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posted 04-21-2013 11:17 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for JSC01     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Great pictures, thanks for posting! I was wondering how the AFM CCT display was progressing... It looks like they opened a public access passage in back near the airlock port. To my untrained eye, that is a bit different than the 'plan' diagram at the top of the thread. I wonder if they still plan to finish the full display, or are changing their plans.

p51
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posted 04-21-2013 08:44 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for p51   Click Here to Email p51     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
How may shuttle noses were in that building at JSC anyway? I know the FFT is in Seattle and have seen it several times. The nose section in the AF museum is another complete cockpit and I for sure saw yet another nose section in the same building when I was at JSC in September...

Robert Pearlman
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posted 04-21-2013 09:35 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
There were two Crew Compartment Trainers (CCT-1 and CCT-2) and one Full Fuselage Trainer (FFT). CCT-1 is now in Dayton. CCT-2 is remaining in Building 9 at Johnson Space Center for now, on hold for Space Center Houston.

Constellation One
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posted 04-25-2013 08:43 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Constellation One   Click Here to Email Constellation One     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
If I recall correctly, the trainer will be in the new building once constructed. The display will not be built until then.

Although I'm glad Dayton received something, I was really disappointed when I seen the trainer.

You just don't get "the feeling" of standing in the greatness of space history that would have been provided by a real spacecraft. I had more of a "meh, it's a tool", feeling. Yes, I suspect it was important and all, but just isn't anywhere close to the same. Kinda like forth place in the Olympics.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 04-25-2013 02:59 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Constellation One:
You just don't get "the feeling" of standing in the greatness of space history that would have been provided by a real spacecraft.
I guess it is a matter of perspective.

Long before I ever got near a real space shuttle, let alone climbed in one, I visited Johnson Space Center and had the chance to climb into CCT-1. To say that the experience was thrilling would be an understatement.

At the time, I had no idea if I would ever come within an arm's length of a flown orbiter, but it didn't matter because I could picture John Young and Bob Crippen sitting in CCT-1, training for STS-1. That was more than enough to inspire visions of history.

JSC01
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posted 04-25-2013 04:23 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for JSC01     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I'd second that opinion... 15 years at NASA, and I have had the privilege of sitting in Atlantis. However only just recently was I able to tour the inside of the CCT. It's so identical to a real orbiter, it is indistinguishable.

Being inside a CCT is almost as thrilling as being in a real orbiter. You really can't tell the difference.

So while the CCT may look plain on the outside, the magic is on the inside. And since the crew only lived in the mid-deck and flight deck of a shuttle (which the CCT has...) you see exactly what the crew living conditions were for a space shuttle flight. Magic! And, you can't do THAT when you go see any of the real orbiters...

These are not re-creations for educational purposes, they are the actual trainers our astronauts used preparing for flight. You stand where they trained. I’m sure when the Air Force museum finishes up the display; the exterior will also be very impressive.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 12-08-2013 11:39 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
National Museum of the U.S. Air Force release (excerpt)
World's largest military aviation museum ready to build new addition

The world's largest military aviation museum is about to get bigger.

The National Museum of the U.S. Air Force is set to expand its legacy with a new 224,000 square foot building to be constructed by Turner Construction Co. of Washington, D.C.

The contract for the museum's newest building, which will be similar in size and shape to its three existing hangars, was awarded by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Louisville District, for the amount of $35.426 million, and is being privately financed by the Air Force Museum Foundation, a non-profit organization chartered to assist in the development and expansion of the museum's facilities.

Current plans call for construction to begin in late spring 2014 and be completed in the summer of 2015. The museum will then begin populating the building that fall. A public opening is anticipated in late 2015.

According to Museum Director Lt. Gen. (Ret.) Jack Hudson, the fourth building will provide more educational opportunities, increase visitor access to the presidential and research and development aircraft and improve visitor experience with space exhibits and large aircraft...

The new Space Gallery will showcase the Space Shuttle exhibit featuring NASA's first Crew Compartment Trainer (CCT-1), a high-fidelity representation of a space shuttle crew station used primarily for on-orbit crew training and engineering evaluations. As a major exhibit component of that gallery, visitors will be able to walk onto a full-size representation of a NASA space shuttle payload bay and look inside the CCT-1 cockpit and mid-deck areas. Conceptual plans call for the gallery to also include a Titan IV space launch vehicle, Mercury, Gemini and Apollo spacecraft and many NASA artifacts such as a nose cap assembly, landing gear strut and a variety of astronaut equipment. A range of satellites and related items will showcase the Air Force's vast reconnaissance, early warning, communications and other space-based capabilities...

The Air Force Museum Foundation recently gifted the funds necessary to begin construction of the building and will continue fundraising toward their campaign goal of $46 million, which would provide additional options and amenities for the building.

Since its inception, the Foundation has contributed more than $85.6 million for museum construction, expansion and facility upgrades.

p51
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posted 12-08-2013 08:02 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for p51   Click Here to Email p51     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by JSC01:
Being inside a CCT is almost as thrilling as being in a real orbiter. You really can't tell the difference.
I agree, having been in a flown orbiter once, you cannot tell the difference inside a trainer like this.

I've been in the one in Seattle twice now and it never gets old. People at first griped loudly that the museum didn't get a flown orbiter (especially as it was one of the few museums that had the building already built for an orbiter and Boeing support to get it off the SCA), but I think now that plenty of people have gotten to go tour the inside, knowing they could never do that with the museum orbiters, people generally feel it was perhaps a better deal.

Constellation One
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posted 12-08-2013 11:49 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Constellation One   Click Here to Email Constellation One     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Public can get inside your trainer? It is my understanding you will only be able to "look in" the Dayton trainer.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 12-09-2013 12:06 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
As the illustrations above show, the Museum of the U.S. Air Force is planning to configure/alter the CCT-1 trainer, such that the public will be able to look into both levels of the crew cabin.

In Seattle, which you can read more about and discuss here, retained the original structure intact, but offers a premium tour for small groups.

Robert Pearlman
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Posts: 29396
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 02-14-2014 02:07 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
collectSPACE
Full-size space shuttle exhibit launching at Air Force Museum in Ohio

A historic mockup of a NASA space shuttle crew cabin has grown wings and a tail to launch as the newest exhibit at the National Museum of the U.S. Air Force in Ohio.

Set to debut Wednesday, Feb. 26, the Dayton museum's Space Shuttle Exhibit was built around NASA's first Crew Compartment Trainer (CCT), which has now been outfitted with a full-size representation of the shuttle's payload bay, engine and tail sections.

The new exhibit offers museum visitors the opportunity to experience the size and shape of an actual space shuttle orbiter by entering through the 60-foot-long (18 m) payload bay and looking into the trainer's flight deck and mid-deck levels. The ramps that lead into and out of the new display form the shape of the wings for the replica vehicle.

astro-nut
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Posts: 589
From: washington, Illinois USA
Registered: Jan 2006

posted 02-22-2014 08:23 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for astro-nut   Click Here to Email astro-nut     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Got to see the Crew Compartment Trainer last spring with fellow collectSPACE members Mark and Brad and looking forward to seeing it in its new configuration.

Robert Pearlman
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Posts: 29396
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 03-14-2014 10:38 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Here's a video walk-through of the Space Shuttle Exhibit:

Constellation One
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Posts: 75
From: Lorain, Ohio, USA
Registered: Aug 2008

posted 04-07-2014 12:39 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Constellation One   Click Here to Email Constellation One     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
This weekend I had the opportunity to visit the museum. First off, I still believe Dayton deserved and would have been a better selection for a shuttle.

With that said, they did a fantastic job creating the shuttle in spirit! It is a top notch display that has room to grow.

I enjoyed the simulators and the ability to get just about inside the display.

I really think the next step should be the acquisition of a high fidelity simulator that can be sat in with supervision.

I shot some photos in an effort to highlight the atmosphere of the display.

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