Space News
space history and artifacts articles

Messages
space history discussion forums

Sightings
worldwide astronaut appearances

Resources
selected space history documents

Websites
related space history websites

  collectSPACE: Messages
  Exploration: Asteroids, Moon and Mars
  Ares I-X, Ares I-Y and Ares V-Y

Post New Topic  Post A Reply
profile | register | preferences | faq | search

next newest topic | next oldest topic
Author Topic:   Ares I-X, Ares I-Y and Ares V-Y
Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27328
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 02-27-2007 04:17 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The Constellation flights have been renamed. Ares I-X, Ares I-Y and Ares V-Y replaced Orion 1, 2 and Ares V-1. The remaining flights were also renumbered.


(Click above to enlarge in new window.)

LCDR Scott Schneeweis
New Member

Posts:
From:
Registered:

posted 02-27-2007 04:38 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for LCDR Scott Schneeweis   Click Here to Email LCDR Scott Schneeweis     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Following IOC (2013?), two flights annually (with STS retired) doesnt seem sufficiently robust to keep ISS gainfully employed while concurrently conducting developmental work on Constellation ...is NASA hanging its hat on Russian/Euro vaporare (Kliper) being available to augment Orion flights?

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27328
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 02-27-2007 04:44 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
No, it is relying on Russian Soyuz, Progress and ESA ATV flights. Kliper was shelved by Russia some time ago.

KSCartist
Member

Posts: 2488
From: Titusville, FL USA
Registered: Feb 2005

posted 03-29-2007 08:41 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for KSCartist   Click Here to Email KSCartist     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Does anyone know how many of the Orion flights between 2013 and 2020 will be ISS flights? I am assuming that at least a few of the early manned flights will be test flights of the CSM.

Also is there a list of how many crewmembers for these flights?

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27328
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 03-29-2007 09:29 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
From The Space Review, March 5, 2007, So that's what they mean by sustainable and affordable by Taylor Dinerman:
Administrator Mike Griffin has said that due to budget problems the agency will not be able to resume human space operations until 2015. According to the solicitation, which must have been put together a while ago, NASA had hoped to have the Initial Operating Capability Orion 4 (IOC) flight ready to go in September 2013, followed by two missions a year until 2016. The agency's rules have been interpreted to prevent them from publicly announcing plans to use the International Space Station beyond 2016. There are standing instructions, however, that no plans be made that preclude use of the ISS after that date.

...the Orion missions to the ISS will not be the basic taxi type missions now performed by the reliable and well-understood Soyuz vehicle. They will probably be operational test and development flights that will allow NASA to shake out any bugs in the spacecraft in the relative safety of LEO. After that, the system will be ready for the lunar missions and later, perhaps, beyond.

Orion is capable of flying six astronauts to LEO (and the ISS) but its not clear if the few test flights planned to the station will need such a large compliment.

Rodina
New Member

Posts:
From:
Registered:

posted 03-29-2007 11:15 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Rodina   Click Here to Email Rodina     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Two flights a year? Two?

That's the way to bring launch costs down, guys!

mjanovec
Member

Posts: 3593
From: Midwest, USA
Registered: Jul 2005

posted 03-30-2007 09:10 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for mjanovec   Click Here to Email mjanovec     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I count three manned flights in 2018, four in 2019, and three in 2020.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27328
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 03-30-2007 09:17 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by mjanovec:
I count three manned flights in 2018, four in 2019, and three in 2020.
If you are going by the above chart, it is outdated, especially in regards to the dates. After this chart was produced in February, Griffin announced that due to budget cutbacks, the earliest Orion I-Y could launch would be 2013 and that the first crewed flight, as referenced by The Space Review excerpt above, would be delayed to 2015 at earliest.

Hart Sastrowardoyo
Member

Posts: 2123
From: Toms River, NJ,USA
Registered: Aug 2000

posted 03-30-2007 01:34 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Hart Sastrowardoyo   Click Here to Email Hart Sastrowardoyo     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
So, putting this all together, if this holds, that means a five-year gap between end of Shuttle in 2010 and first crewed flight of Orion in 2015, with Russian Soyuz flights to ISS between 2010 and 2015? How much money will be going to Russia for those ISS flights, and where will that funding come from (e.g., will funding those Soyuz flights mean a corresponding drop in funding for Orion?)

mjanovec
Member

Posts: 3593
From: Midwest, USA
Registered: Jul 2005

posted 03-30-2007 01:37 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for mjanovec   Click Here to Email mjanovec     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
While two missions a year doesn't sound like many, keep in mind that NASA flew 31 missions from 1961 to 1975, in which Mercury, Gemini, Apollo, Skylab, and ASTP took place. For many, these were the glory years of NASA.

31 missions in 15 years averages out to 2.1 missions a year.

E2M Lem Man
Member

Posts: 793
From: Los Angeles CA. USA
Registered: Jan 2005

posted 04-05-2007 06:17 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for E2M Lem Man     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
This schedule reminds me of the plans for the Apollo Applications Program (AAP), where they were going to go back to the Saturn orbital workshop many times. It became Skylab and they went 3 times.

I am frightened that ISS will become this.

All times are CT (US)

next newest topic | next oldest topic

Administrative Options: Close Topic | Archive/Move | Delete Topic
Post New Topic  Post A Reply
Hop to:

Contact Us | The Source for Space History & Artifacts

Copyright 1999-2012 collectSPACE.com All rights reserved.


Ultimate Bulletin Board 5.47a





advertisement