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  Scott Carpenter and Fabien Cousteau's Mission 31

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Author Topic:   Scott Carpenter and Fabien Cousteau's Mission 31
Duke Of URL
Member

Posts: 1305
From: Syracuse, NY, USA
Registered: Jan 2005

posted 08-07-2013 02:27 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Duke Of URL   Click Here to Email Duke Of URL     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Fabian Cousteau is preparing a new expedition to the seafloor.
No exploration team has ever spent 31 full days submerged underwater in the name of science and discovery, but a new ocean exploration endeavor named Mission 31 led by noted filmmaker and oceanographic explorer, Fabien Cousteau will launch this fall to test new science and tech-based experiments with underwater motorcycles, autonomous robots and Kirby Morgan tech diving helmets.

Cousteau announced the global Mission 31 endeavor on the anniversary of his grandfather's birthday (June 11). Aquarius, owned by NOAA and managed by Florida International University, will serve as Mission 31's base camp for Cousteau's team to explore climate, pollution and overconsumption problems. Located 63 feet under sea level in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary (nine miles south of Key Largo), this "inner-space" station is the only undersea marine habitat and lab in the world and will be the longest mission Aquarius has hosted.

The duration and depth of Mission 31 is remarkably similar to SEALAB II, a Navy project that took place off California. As part of this experiment, Mercury 7 astronaut Scott Carpenter lived at 62 meters for 30 days, during which he had an epic (and hilarious) three-way conversation with Gordon Cooper, orbiting in Gemini 5, and Lyndon Johnson.

Carpenter has never gotten his due as a brave explorer. I believe he never flew in space after Aurora 7 because of injuries suffered in Bermuda connected to an earlier SEALAB mission, and that the false stories surrounding this were "astro-politics" at their worst.

He's overdue for the recognition and acclaim he deserves.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27465
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 08-07-2013 02:29 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Duke Of URL:
The duration and depth of Mission 31 is remarkably similar to SEALAB II...
The duration is similar but SEALAB II was at a depth of more than 200 feet, whereas Aquarius is at 63 feet.
quote:
[Scott Carpenter is] overdue for the recognition and acclaim he deserves.
Aquarius is located in Carpenter Basin, off the coast of Key Largo, Florida.

Duke Of URL
Member

Posts: 1305
From: Syracuse, NY, USA
Registered: Jan 2005

posted 08-07-2013 07:38 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Duke Of URL   Click Here to Email Duke Of URL     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Cousteau's expedition will also involve saturation diving, as did SEALAB.

This is a very exciting project.

onesmallstep
Member

Posts: 532
From: Staten Island, New York USA
Registered: Nov 2007

posted 08-08-2013 09:07 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for onesmallstep   Click Here to Email onesmallstep     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I agree that Carpenter got a raw deal at the time he was seconded to the Navy for Sealab. As was noted in other forums in cS, especially by his daughter Kris Stoever, he really came up against a brick wall with Chris Kraft and others in NASA after his flight in Aurora 7. Maybe if they had a more objective opinion at the time, things would have turned out different. Even all these years later, in interviews Kraft seems not to have changed his opinion or decisions. At least Carpenter always takes the high ground in this matter.

Recognition, yes - but acclaim and accolades maybe don't fit his personality. But as one of two surviving Mercury astronauts, I think he, along with his best friend John Glenn, are still looked upon with respect and admiration by the present generation of astronauts, and deservedly so.

carmelo
Member

Posts: 793
From: Messina, Sicilia, Italia
Registered: Jun 2004

posted 08-08-2013 10:56 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for carmelo   Click Here to Email carmelo     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Carpenter would have been for one Skylab mission.

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