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Author Topic:   Russian women cosmonauts
chappy
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Posts: 213
From: Cardiff, S. Wales, UK
Registered: Apr 2006

posted 10-11-2007 04:46 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for chappy   Click Here to Email chappy     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Since the last Russian woman flew into space (Elena Kondakova, I think), what happened to the other women cosmonauts? Have any of them been named for any missions? Who and when?? It's been a while since the last one flew. Why?

LadyCosmos
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posted 10-12-2007 02:52 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for LadyCosmos   Click Here to Email LadyCosmos     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Nadeja Kuljelnaya was back-up for Soyuz TM-33 but she left cosmonauts group since few years. No luck for her...



In 2001, Soyuz TM-33 crew and back-up in Le Bourget Air & Space show (with Minister of Research and Space).

I believe, but maybe I wrong, no woman actually in cosmonauts group.

LadyCosmos

Robert Pearlman
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Posts: 27328
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 10-12-2007 08:45 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by LadyCosmos:
I believe, but maybe I wrong, no woman actually in cosmonauts group.
Yelena Serova, wife of cosmonaut Mark Serov, was chosen as a candidate in 2006.

For a history as to why the Russians feel they do not need nor desire women in their corps, see Jim Oberg's MSNBC article, Does Mars need women? Russians say no.

Jay Chladek
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Posts: 2211
From: Bellevue, NE, USA
Registered: Aug 2007

posted 10-12-2007 08:45 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Jay Chladek   Click Here to Email Jay Chladek     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Talk about a strange irony actually. When it was the Soviet Union, the space program went out of its way to fly a woman and even had a couple fly to the later Salyut stations as fully trained cosmonauts (with plans to fly an all women crew to Salyut 7 before it lost power in orbit). Then the Soviet Union fell and it became pretty much a male dominated profession, probably since there were no longer any dictates from the Kremlin on the matter.

Contrast that with the United States. No women flew in Mercury, Gemini or Apollo as it was a male dominated profession, mainly with the jet time requirement being the sticking point. But, get to the shuttle program and women became a fully integrated (and respected) part of flight crews. Now we have a female ISS commander and will soon have the second female shuttle commander flying Discovery in a little under a month (hopefully).

eurospace
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Posts: 2275
From: Brussels, Belgium
Registered: Dec 2000

posted 10-13-2007 01:31 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for eurospace   Click Here to Email eurospace     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Jay,

I think you're viewing the Soviet's will to fly women into space a bit too rosy.

Tereshkova's flight was a propaganda coup. So was the intention to fly three women in one mission. Sometimes propaganda requirements outshone the underlying machism, but it was always there. Women were never considered being "at their place" in space. Savizkaya only got into space because her father was a high ranking Soviet general. When Sharman flew, leading cosmonauts made derisory comments (duly denied when they become public), Glazkov publically stated women belonged into the kitchen, not into space, Ryumin opposed the flight of his wife (Kondakova), but was overruled. Kuzhelnaya never had a fair chance for a flight, and neither will Serova. Where the US society has changed, the Russian society has not.

------------------
Jürgen P Esders
Berlin, Germany

International Director (Europe), Space Unit
Vice President, Weltraum Philatelie e. V.

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Astroaddies

Jay Chladek
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Posts: 2211
From: Bellevue, NE, USA
Registered: Aug 2007

posted 10-14-2007 09:25 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Jay Chladek   Click Here to Email Jay Chladek     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Propaganda or not, it was politics that deemed Soviet women to fly, no doubt about that. Okay, so the Soviets didn't "go out of their way" to fly a lot of women, but political mandates did have a role. Afterall, the ideal of communism is that men and women can do what they want for the good of the state regardless of gender and the Soviets made steps to showcase that to the west when reality tended to be a bit different inside their borders.

Even in WW2 when some Soviet women were among the top scoring Soviet aces in fighter planes (such as Lily Litvyak) they still tended to be treated as second class citizens and men hated to fly with them.

kosmonavtka
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Posts: 170
From: Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Registered: Aug 2003

posted 10-16-2007 03:16 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for kosmonavtka     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
A lot of men in the Russian space program deserve a punch in the nose! Their attitude towards women just sucks.

All times are CT (US)

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