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  [Discuss] SpaceX CRS-17 station mission

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Author Topic:   [Discuss] SpaceX CRS-17 station mission
Robert Pearlman
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From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 04-19-2019 10:54 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Please use this topic to discuss SpaceX's seventeenth Dragon cargo flight to the International Space Station under NASA's Commercial Resupply Services (CRS) contract.

Robert Pearlman
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From: Houston, TX
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posted 04-19-2019 10:55 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA release
A SpaceX Dragon cargo spacecraft is now scheduled to launch at 4:22 a.m. EDT [0822 GMT] on Tuesday, April 30, on a Falcon 9 rocket from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. This will be SpaceX's 17th Commercial Resupply Services contract mission to the International Space Station for NASA.

SpaceX will take advantage of the additional time to perform a static fire test and pre-flight checkouts. Falcon 9 and Dragon are on track to be flight ready for an earlier launch attempt, however, April 30 is the most viable date for both NASA and SpaceX due to station and orbital mechanics constraints.

OV-105
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From: Ridgecrest, CA
Registered: Sep 2000

posted 04-21-2019 02:15 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for OV-105   Click Here to Email OV-105     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Wonder if this flight will be delayed since the Dragon Crew anomaly.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 04-22-2019 10:37 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
A NASA spokesperson today (April 22) said that the CRS-17 mission remains set for launch on April 30, as of now.

Robert Pearlman
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From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 04-23-2019 02:10 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
One result of the Crew Dragon engine test anomaly, the CRS-17 first stage recovery has been moved from Landing Zone-1 to the droneship "to ensure the integrity of the area and preserve valuable information."

Robert Pearlman
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From: Houston, TX
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posted 04-27-2019 11:05 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
From SpaceX on Twitter, CRS-17 set to lift off on Wednesday (May 1) at 3:59 a.m. EDT (0759 GMT):
Static fire test of Falcon 9 complete — targeting May 1 launch from Pad 40 in Florida for Dragon's seventeenth mission to the space station.

Robert Pearlman
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From: Houston, TX
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posted 04-29-2019 02:44 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA update:
Monday morning (April 29), teams identified an issue with the International Space Station's electrical power system and are working to identify the root cause and restore full power to the system. There are no immediate concerns for the crew or the station.

An issue is being worked with a Main Bus Switching Unit (MBSU) that distributes electrical power to two of the eight power channels on the station. Flight controllers have been working to route power through the remaining six power channels. Electrical power generated by the station's solar arrays is fed to all station systems through these power channels.

Discussions are underway to determine any impacts to SpaceX's CRS-17 cargo resupply mission targeted for launch May 1.

Robert Pearlman
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From: Houston, TX
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posted 04-29-2019 10:20 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Multiple sources (and media outfits) tonight (April 29) are saying the CRS-17 launch will be delayed to no earlier than Friday (May 3) as NASA continues to troubleshoot the power issue on the space station.

Robert Pearlman
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From: Houston, TX
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posted 04-30-2019 11:33 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA update
NASA has requested SpaceX move off from May 1 for the launch of the company’s 17th commercial resupply mission to the International Space Station.

On April 29, the space station team identified an issue with one of the station’s Main Bus Switching Units that distributes power to two of the eight power channels on the station. There are no immediate concerns for the crew or the station. Teams are working on a plan to robotically replace the failed unit and restore full power to the station system. Additional information will be provided as it becomes available. The earliest possible launch opportunity is no earlier than Friday, May 3.

Robert Pearlman
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From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 05-02-2019 09:32 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA update
This morning, Robotics Ground Controllers in Mission Control Houston successfully completed an operation to remove a failed Main Bus Switching Unit-3 and replace it with a spare.

The MBSU in question had failed on April 29 and reduced the station's power supply by about 25%. There were no immediate concerns for the crew or the station. The crew had installed a series of jumpers in Node 1 following the failure to reroute power to experiments and hardware and ensure limited impact to continued station operations.

Since the successful replacement, the MBSU was powered up and checked out successfully with all station systems back to nominal power configuration, including redundant power to the Canadarm2 robotic arm.

NASA's commercial cargo provider SpaceX is targeting 3:11 a.m. EDT on Friday, May 3, for the launch of its 17th resupply mission to the International Space Station.

Robert Pearlman
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From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 05-03-2019 02:05 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Launch of SpaceX's CRS-17 Dragon mission to the International Space Station was scrubbed on Friday (May 3). From SpaceX on Twitter:
Standing down today due to an electrical issue on the Of Course I Still Love You droneship. Teams will also address the ground side helium leak before tomorrow's backup launch opportunity at 2:48 a.m. EDT, 6:48 UTC.

Robert Pearlman
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From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 05-04-2019 01:52 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Liftoff! SpaceX's CRS-17 Dragon mission launched at 2:48 a.m. EDT (0648 GMT) on Friday (May 4) from Space Launch Complex 40 (SLC-40) at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Florida. From SpaceX on Twitter:
Falcon 9 booster has landed on Of Course I Still Love You!

Second stage engine burn complete. Dragon confirmed in good orbit.

hlbjr
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Posts: 466
From: Delray Beach Florida USA
Registered: Mar 2006

posted 05-04-2019 02:15 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for hlbjr   Click Here to Email hlbjr     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
39th Falcon 9 booster fly back and landing. Just incredible what has become routine.

oly
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Posts: 737
From: Perth, Western Australia
Registered: Apr 2015

posted 05-04-2019 02:20 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for oly   Click Here to Email oly     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The landing droneship was used for this flight because Landing Zone 1 is closed due to the Crew Dragon investigation. How far offshore was the drone ship for this landing? Was the landing visible from the shore?

SpaceX are supplying some fantastic footage of these launch and landings.

AstroCasey
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Registered: Feb 2019

posted 05-04-2019 09:39 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for AstroCasey     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Early in the SpaceX webcast, it is stated that the droneship was only 12 nautical miles offshore. Other sources claim the distance is 17 miles. Close either way. I'm also curious how visible the landing was to spectators on the coast.

Robert Pearlman
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Posts: 41587
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 05-04-2019 11:38 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
These videos show the view of the landing from Cocoa Beach, both from the ground and from the air (via drone).

All times are CT (US)

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