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  ISRO's Mangalyaan: Viewing, questions, comments

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Author Topic:   ISRO's Mangalyaan: Viewing, questions, comments
Robert Pearlman
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Posts: 28202
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 11-04-2013 09:38 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
ISRO's Mars Orbiter: mission viewing, questions, comments
This thread is for comments and questions regarding India's first mission to Mars and the updates published under the topic: ISRO's Mars Orbiter Mission.

Mars Orbiter Mission is India's first interplanetary mission to planet Mars with an orbiter craft designed to orbit Mars in an elliptical orbit. The mission is primarily technological mission considering the critical mission operations and stringent requirements on propulsion and other bus systems of spacecraft.

SpaceAholic
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Posts: 3115
From: Sierra Vista, Arizona
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 11-04-2013 09:41 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for SpaceAholic   Click Here to Email SpaceAholic     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Business Standard reports that the Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV) is all set for its 25th mission and this time it is on a voyage to another planet – The Mars.
The 44.4 m long PSLV-C25, with Indian flag painted on the Nose, stands erect looking at the blue sky at the ISRO's Satish Dhawan Space Centre at Sriharikotta, some 100 kms from Chennai. The Vehicle, with payload, has went through over eight hours of test on Thursday and ISRO said it was successful.

This time, the Mission of PSLV and 5th in the XL configuration, will carry the Mars Orbiter Satellite (1337 kg) into a 250 km X 23500 km elliptical orbit. The Satellite will be further navigated to a hyperbolic departure technology and thereafter it traverses an interplanetary cruise trajectory before reaching the intended orbit around the Mars, according to ISRO.

The vehicle is expected to reach its destination sometime in September 2014.

gliderpilotuk
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From: London, UK
Registered: Feb 2002

posted 11-05-2013 03:37 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for gliderpilotuk   Click Here to Email gliderpilotuk     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
400 million people without electricity and 600 million without sanitation, but hey we can go to Mars!

Apollo14LMP
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Posts: 211
From: UK
Registered: Nov 2007

posted 11-05-2013 08:26 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Apollo14LMP   Click Here to Email Apollo14LMP     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
No offense intended but why is India launching a Mars probe — half of its people are living in abject poverty — just don't see how they can justify this waste of money?

Editor's note: Threads merged.

dom
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Posts: 475
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Registered: Aug 2001

posted 11-05-2013 08:27 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for dom   Click Here to Email dom     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Slightly jealous me thinks. I seem to remember the average person in Britain had a pretty low standard of living during the Victorian period you Brits are so misty eyed about! (And let's not mention the Beagle probe)

Go India! Never mind us miserable Europeans - we had our day in the sun. Let the Asian space race begin...

Apollo14LMP
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Posts: 211
From: UK
Registered: Nov 2007

posted 11-05-2013 08:28 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Apollo14LMP   Click Here to Email Apollo14LMP     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Not jealous — just feel sorry for the poor in the country. The US faced protests at the time of Apollo. Britain is in such of a mess they could not afford to spend more on space.

Private companies doing a lot better in the UK — satellites and such like...

India and the UK are two different places and if we were to start talk of developing a space program I think there would be uproar! And quite rightly so when people are going to foodbanks to eat. Just my take...

Nothing would surpass Apollo — as Charlie Duke once said to me "there will never be another time like Apollo."

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 28202
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 11-05-2013 08:28 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The Planetary Society's Emily Lakdawalla addresses this sentiment:
As a nation that contains hundreds of millions of people living in crushing poverty, how can they spend money on space exploration?

This is a fair question. I've driven past slums in Mumbai with a sick feeling in my heart at the difficulty of the lives that they lead, and the enormity and complexity of the problem of improving their conditions. However, there's an error in the question. It assumes that there is a fixed quantity of wealth in India, and that stopping investment in high-tech industry would mean more money for the poor. Wealth doesn't work that way; there is not a fixed quantity of it. The technology India is developing for this mission has direct commercial applications, generating economic activity that will increase the nation's overall wealth. And I think that backers of India's space program believe that achieving a successful mission to Mars would increase confidence in India's technological prowess and therefore the flow of investment money. To be seen in the company of the U.S. and China and Europe would have to stimulate such investment...

SkyMan1958
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Posts: 408
From: CA.
Registered: Jan 2011

posted 11-05-2013 01:24 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for SkyMan1958   Click Here to Email SkyMan1958     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Hey, it's a lot better than Pakistan spending money on nukes...

I'm one of those people who believe that it makes sense to make investments in the future even when there are human issues in the present. The last I heard tell was that there was ABJECT poverty in Europe when the New World was found and explored.

dom
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Posts: 475
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Registered: Aug 2001

posted 11-26-2013 05:09 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for dom   Click Here to Email dom     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Here's an interesting fact reported in the latest issue of Flight International magazine. At $75 million, this mission actually costs LESS than that spent to make the Hollywood movie Gravity!

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