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  NASA's Glory mission to Earth's atmosphere

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Author Topic:   NASA's Glory mission to Earth's atmosphere
Robert Pearlman
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Posts: 27328
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 09-25-2008 07:50 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA release
Send Your Name Around The Earth On NASA's Glory Mission

Members of the public can send their names around Earth on NASA's Glory satellite, the first mission dedicated to understanding the effects of particles in the atmosphere and the sun's variability on our climate.

The "Send Your Name Around the Earth" Web site enables everyone to take part in the science mission and place their names in orbit for years to come.

Participants will receive a printable certificate from NASA and have their name recorded on a microchip that will become part of the spacecraft. The deadline for submitting names is Nov. 1, 2008.

The Glory satellite will allow scientists to measure airborne particles more accurately from space than ever before. The particles, known as "aerosols," are tiny bits of material found in Earth's atmosphere, like dust and smog.

"Undoubtedly, greenhouse gases cause the biggest climatic effect," said Michael Mishchenko, the Glory project scientist at NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies in New York. "But the uncertainty in the aerosol effect is the biggest uncertainty in climate at the present."

Glory will carry two scientific instruments, the Aerosol Polarimetry Sensor, or APS, and the Total Irradiance Monitor, or TIM, and two cameras for cloud identification. The APS instrument will help quantify the role of aerosols as natural and human-produced agents of climate change more accurately than existing measurement tools. The TIM instrument will continue 30 years of measuring total solar irradiance, the amount of energy radiating from the sun to Earth, with improved accuracy and stability. Understanding the sun's energy is an important key to understanding climate change on Earth.

Glory is scheduled for launch in June 2009 from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California. Glory will orbit as part of the Afternoon Constellation, or "A-Train," a series of Earth-observing satellites. The A-Train spacecraft follow each other in close formation, crossing the equator a few minutes apart shortly after 1:30 p.m. local time each day. The A-Train orbits Earth once every 100 minutes.

NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., is responsible for Glory project management. Orbital Sciences Corporation in Dulles, Va., is responsible for development, integration and operations of the spacecraft. Raytheon in El Segundo, Calif., is responsible for development of the APS. The Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics in Boulder, Colo., is responsible for the development of the TIM. Glory's cloud cameras were built by Ball Aerospace and Technologies of Boulder.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27328
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 02-23-2011 05:51 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Glory's launch on Taurus delayed

The launch of NASA's Glory spacecraft from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California has been postponed at least 24 hours.

During the final 15 minutes before Wednesday's scheduled launch of 4:09 a.m. CST (1009 GMT), the vehicle interface control console, a ground interface with Orbital Sciences' Taurus XL rocket, gave an unexpected reading. The cause and potential effect of the reading was not fully understood.

With a 48-second available launch window, there was insufficient time to analyze the issue causing the launch to be postponed. Members of the Taurus team are troubleshooting the issue.

The next launch attempt is no earlier than Thursday, Feb. 24, at 4:09 a.m. CST.

Data from the Glory mission will allow scientists to better understand how the sun and tiny atmospheric particles called aerosols affect Earth's climate. Both aerosols and solar energy influence the planet's energy budget -- the amount of energy entering and exiting Earth's atmosphere. An accurate measurement of these impacts is important in order to anticipate future changes to our climate and how they may affect human life.

The first of NASA's Educational Launch of Nanosatellite, or ELaNa, missions will also launch on the Taurus XL. These auxiliary payloads are small satellites called CubeSats. Each is designed and created by university and college students. Three satellites will be deployed on ELaNa-1.

Project management for Glory is the responsibility of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. The launch management for the mission is the responsibility of NASA's Launch Services Program at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Orbital Sciences Corporation of Dulles, Va., is the launch service provider of the four-stage Taurus XL rocket and is also builder of the Glory satellite for Goddard.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 02-23-2011 09:21 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA release
NASA Schedules Next Glory Mission Launch Attempt

The launch of NASA’s Glory spacecraft from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California is currently planned for no earlier than Friday, Feb. 25 at 5:09 a.m. EST. Engineers from NASA and Orbital Sciences Corp. continue to troubleshoot a technical issue that arose during Wednesday's initial launch attempt. The target launch date also will ensure personnel get the required rest before entering another countdown.

The Glory satellite is being launched aboard an Orbital Sciences Taurus XL rocket on a mission to improve our understanding of how the sun and tiny atmospheric particles called aerosols affect Earth's climate.

NASA Television will broadcast the launch live. Live coverage is planned to begin at 3:30 a.m. EST.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 03-03-2011 07:40 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA release
NASA's Glory Satellite Scheduled for Launch on March 4

NASA's Glory spacecraft is scheduled for launch on Friday, March 4. Technical issues with ground support equipment for the Taurus XL launch vehicle led to the scrub of the original Feb. 23 launch attempt. Those issues have been resolved.

The March 4 liftoff from Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif., is targeted for 5:09:43 a.m. EST, in the middle of a 48-second launch window. Spacecraft separation occurs 13 minutes after launch.

Data from the Glory mission will allow scientists to better understand how the sun and tiny atmospheric particles called aerosols affect Earth's climate. The Taurus XL also carries the first of NASA's Educational Launch of Nanosatellite missions. This auxiliary payload contains three small satellites called CubeSats, which were designed and created by university and college students.

NASA Television will carry launch coverage beginning March 4 at 3:30 a.m.

issman1
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Posts: 888
From: UK
Registered: Apr 2005

posted 03-04-2011 05:10 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for issman1     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA Glory mission ends in failure

It appears the fairing - the part of the rocket which covers the satellite on top of the launcher - did not separate properly.

Is the fairing mechanism on Taurus XL the same as the one for Taurus II, since the latter will be used to launch supplies to the International Space Station?

Robert Pearlman
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posted 03-04-2011 05:45 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA update
After Liftoff of Taurus XL Rocket, Fairing Fails to Separate

The Glory spacecraft and Taurus XL rocket lifted off this morning on time at 2:09:43 a.m. PST/5:09:43 a.m. EST.

About six minutes into the launch, a spacecraft contingency was declared by Launch Director Omar Baez. Data indicates the rocket fairing did not separate.

Orbital Sciences release
Orbital's Launch of Taurus XL Rocket is Unsuccessful

NASA's Glory Satellite Fails to Achieve Orbit

Orbital Sciences Corporation (NYSE: ORB) today announced that the launch of its Taurus XL rocket, which lifted off earlier today at 2:09 a.m. (PST), from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California carrying the company-built Glory satellite for NASA, was unsuccessful.

Preliminary indications are that the rocket's payload fairing, a clamshell mechanism that encases the satellite as it travels through the atmosphere, failed to separate from the rocket. The previous time a Taurus XL rocket was launched was in 2009 for NASA's Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO) mission. That launch also resulted in a failure due to a fairing separation problem. Since that time Orbital redesigned and tested the fairing separation system.

Orbital will immediately convene a failure investigation board that will include representative from the company and NASA to determine the cause of today's launch failure. Orbital believes that it is likely that sufficient data was gathered to be able to determine the cause of the fairing separation failure.

SpaceAholic
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Posts: 3023
From: Sierra Vista, Arizona
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 03-04-2011 06:31 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for SpaceAholic   Click Here to Email SpaceAholic     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Deja vu... NASA lost a bird not too long ago due to the same issue and I believe the same launch system (Taurus). Not a good day to be an Orbital shareholder.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 03-04-2011 07:28 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
That was NASA's Orbiting Carbon Observatory, or OCO, which also did not reach orbit because the Taurus launch vehicle fairing failed to separate upon command.

There were changes made to the fairing after the loss of OCO, so the nature of the two failures is not necessarily the same.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 03-04-2011 08:21 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
NASA release
NASA Creates Glory Satellite Mishap Investigation Board

NASA's Glory mission ended Friday after the spacecraft failed to reach orbit following its launch from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California.

NASA has begun the process of creating a Mishap Investigation Board to evaluate the cause of the failure. Telemetry indicated the fairing, a protective shell atop the satellite's Taurus XL rocket, did not separate as expected.

The launch proceeded as planned from its liftoff at 5:09 a.m. EST through the ignition of the Taurus XL's second stage. However, the fairing failure occurred during the second stage engine burn. It is likely the spacecraft fell into the South Pacific, although the exact location is not yet known.

NASA's previous launch attempt of an Earth science spacecraft, the Orbiting Carbon Observatory onboard a Taurus XL on Feb. 24, 2009, also failed to reach orbit when the fairing did not separate.

NASA's Orbiting Carbon Observatory Mishap Investigation Board reviewed launch data and the fairing separation system design, and developed a corrective action plan. The plan was implemented by Taurus XL manufacturer Orbital Sciences Corporation. In October 2010, NASA's Flight Planning Board confirmed the successful closure of the corrective actions.

The Glory Earth-observing satellite was intended to improve our understanding of how the sun and tiny atmospheric particles called aerosols affect Earth's climate.

Go4Launch
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Posts: 400
From: Bethesda, MD
Registered: Jul 2003

posted 03-04-2011 09:05 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Go4Launch   Click Here to Email Go4Launch     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by SpaceAholic:
Not a good day to be an Orbital shareholder.
Indeed -- Orbital off almost 8 percent this morning... Ouch.

Fezman92
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From: New Jersey, USA
Registered: Mar 2010

posted 03-04-2011 11:23 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Fezman92   Click Here to Email Fezman92     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
That's a real shame. I followed this mission and was really hoping to see what data it would collect.

Blackarrow
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Posts: 2024
From: Belfast, United Kingdom
Registered: Feb 2002

posted 03-05-2011 09:09 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Blackarrow     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Two lost satellites. I assume Taurus XL was selected as the launch vehicle because it was cheaper. Sounds like the definition of "false economy."

capoetc
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From: Newnan GA (USA)
Registered: Aug 2005

posted 03-05-2011 10:16 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for capoetc   Click Here to Email capoetc     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Apparently, six of Taurus XL's nine launch attempts have been successful, including its first five attempts. Three of the last four have ended in failure.

Way too small a sample size to declare the system a bust at this point, in my opinion. That's an awful lot of NASA $$$ down the tubes though...

Blackarrow
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From: Belfast, United Kingdom
Registered: Feb 2002

posted 03-05-2011 11:00 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Blackarrow     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Agreed, but anyone responsible for public money would seriously have to ask, from here on, whether it is appropriate to spend public money using a launch-system which has failed in three of its last four attempts. You can understand the decision after five consecutive successes, but 6 out of 9 is very poor and 1 out of 4 is totally unacceptable. They would need to demonstrate several successful tests in a row before anyone could responsibly trust a publically-funded payload to the Taurus XL. In my opinion.

capoetc
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From: Newnan GA (USA)
Registered: Aug 2005

posted 03-05-2011 01:39 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for capoetc   Click Here to Email capoetc     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
You may be right ... but, if it is truly going to be a free-market space launch environment, then let the free market decide if the launch system is worthy or not.

3-of-the-last-4-ending-in-failure should not necessarily disqualify the booster from consideration -- but it should surely be a part of ANYONE's decision (not just NASA) to hire Orbital to launch a payload on Taurus XL.

hlbjr
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From: Delray Beach Florida USA
Registered: Mar 2006

posted 03-06-2011 06:50 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for hlbjr   Click Here to Email hlbjr     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Funny thing about Orbital and their Taurus XL is they are succeeding with the hard part which is fielding a multi-stage rocket which is performing perfectly. To have the payload fairing sep issue must be extremely frustrating as that is a relatively lesser technical task than the successful launch of a multi-stage rocket. The Minotaur series have performed well as has the Pegasus so this is a real head scratcher.

cspg
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From: Geneva, Switzerland
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posted 03-06-2011 08:40 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for cspg   Click Here to Email cspg     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
WHERE is my certificate?

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