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  ESA - JAXA - China - International
  China's Shenzhou VII mission (Page 3)

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Author Topic:   China's Shenzhou VII mission
Max Q
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Posts: 381
From: Whyalla South Australia
Registered: Mar 2007

posted 09-29-2008 04:46 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Max Q   Click Here to Email Max Q     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I think its great to see the Chinese up and running they have nothing to prove and are copying the best space tech available for their needs. Odd not to see an American copy amongst it. Still the Chinese are doing cutting edge as far as there abilities are at the moment and from what I see they are about the only ones at the moment.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27328
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 09-29-2008 09:50 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I think we dismiss all charges of plagiarism and other illegal acts; it's not even technology transfer -- it's outright purchase.

China purchased the technology and training experience from Russia. Taikonauts trained in Star City, and Russian officials were on hand for each Shenzhou flight in mission control.

The thing to remember though, is that China could have stopped there. They could have simply purchased the Soyuz, the Sokols and Orlans, and flown them as is. ESA is working toward launching Soyuz rockets from Kourou, so it's not unprecedented.

Instead, they improved upon the Russian technology. The Shenzhou is a more capable vehicle than the Soyuz. The Feitian is more advanced than the Orlan M that Liu wore during Zhai's spacewalk.

It is inescapable that some of the credit for China's manned space program must fall to earlier era Russian engineers, but to dismiss it because of that would be unfair to both China and Russia.

Hawkman
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Posts: 398
From: Union, New Jersey
Registered: Jan 2001

posted 09-29-2008 12:45 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Hawkman   Click Here to Email Hawkman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The way I figure it, with the spacewalk now under their belts, the Chinese are up to 1965.

Delta7
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Posts: 1153
From: Ossian IN USA
Registered: Oct 2007

posted 09-29-2008 01:36 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Delta7   Click Here to Email Delta7     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Next up: 1966. Rendezvous and docking.

eurospace
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Posts: 2275
From: Brussels, Belgium
Registered: Dec 2000

posted 09-29-2008 02:21 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for eurospace   Click Here to Email eurospace     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Delta7:
Next up: 1966. Rendezvous and docking.
Interesting comparison. That would mean they were just three years from Manned Lunar Landing, two from a full manned lunar orbit.

How many years from Manned Lunar Landing are the US at present?

KSCartist
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From: Titusville, FL USA
Registered: Feb 2005

posted 09-29-2008 02:51 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for KSCartist   Click Here to Email KSCartist     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
We're a lot closer than those countries who only hitch a ride instead of developing their own system.

Tim

David Bryant
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From: Norfolk UK
Registered: Feb 2005

posted 09-30-2008 04:48 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for David Bryant   Click Here to Email David Bryant     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Let's be frank:
  1. The Chinese did a good job: but they're not going to the Moon anytime soon using technology purchased from Russia: the Russians have never managed to get a Cosmonaut out of low Earth orbit.

  2. The UK has achieved nothing worthwhile in space exploration since Black Knight and Blue Streak and has shown no enthusiasm for space travel since the sixties. If it can't be sold to Saudi Arabia, it doesn't get built!

  3. All other contenders (India, Japan, ESA) lack the political will, popular support and funding for advanced spaceflight programs

  4. The jury is still out on how serious the US government is about funding a replacement for the Shuttle or missions to the Moon / Mars. With the current melt-down of western economies / commitments to unwinable conflicts, I don't expect to see a Moon landing in my lifetime (I'm 58).
So good luck to ANYONE who wants to continue sending Astronauts / Taikonauts / Cosmonauts into Space!

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27328
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 09-30-2008 10:03 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Meanwhile, as to the Shenzhou VII mission...

Xinhua: Chinese astronauts back to Beijing

Cheering crowds, including wives and children of the three Chinese taikonauts, greeted here Monday morning the brave trio who fulfilled China's third manned space mission and returned to their training camp in Beijing's suburbs.

After a brief physical checkup upon the Shenzhou-7's safe landing Saturday afternoon on north China's grassland, Chinese taikonauts Zhai Zhigang, Liu Boming and Jing Haipeng were transferred back to the space program headquarters, or space town.

The spacemen were also greeted by their wives and children. At a military airport in Beijing, the wives, all tearful but joyful, accompanied the husbands to a limousine which carried them back to the headquarters.

This was the only brief re-union of the couples before the three astronauts undergo a two-week preventive quarantine in the space town medical facilities.

A new fad on space exploration is swirling Inner Mongolia where an area is reserved for landing of Chinese spaceships. Local people are very interested in buying books on space knowledge.

Delta7
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Posts: 1153
From: Ossian IN USA
Registered: Oct 2007

posted 09-30-2008 10:18 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Delta7   Click Here to Email Delta7     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by David Bryant:
So good luck to ANYONE who wants to continue sending Astronauts / Taikonauts / Cosmonauts into Space!
As far as I'm concerned, human space exploration is human space exploration. I welcome all and any of it. And there's nothing like competition to spur public support for our space program. I for one would be thrilled if China were to announce it intends to beat us back to the moon. And while I would hope we would be up to the challenge and beat them, if they did get there first I wouldn't be any less thrilled.

E2M Lem Man
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Posts: 793
From: Los Angeles CA. USA
Registered: Jan 2005

posted 09-30-2008 10:20 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for E2M Lem Man     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The Chinese mission is historic - but is it more than we thought? What was the first step after EVA for both the US and USSR?

Rendezvous, did they do that already on Shenzhou VII?

On Gemini-5 in 1965, the GT-5 spacecraft released a small pod (read: satellite) from the back of the spacecraft, and attempted to rendezvous with it, until power problems interrupted that attempt (though the crew later accomplished a "Phantom Rendezvous").

On Shenzhou VII, they released a small satellite with television capacity right after the spacewalk - but we haven't heard anything about this. Have the Chinese already jumped ahead a step - and are ready for docking with their own laboratory?

J.M. Busby

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27328
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 09-30-2008 10:39 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by E2M Lem Man:
Have the Chinese already jumped ahead a step - and are ready for docking with their own laboratory?
Not exactly: the operations between the satellite and the orbital module were to take place after the descent module separated and returned to Earth, as described by Zhao Guangheng, deputy chief designer of the country's manned space program's space application system.
"The task will test our ability to observe and control two objects in relative motion in space. Through this, we will prepare for the future orbiter docking."
The skill of piloted rendezvous is still to be achieved by the Shenzhou VIII crew.

cspg
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Posts: 4046
From: Geneva, Switzerland
Registered: May 2006

posted 10-01-2008 12:12 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for cspg   Click Here to Email cspg     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
So rendezvous is next in the picture?

If so, Shenzhou 8 and 9 could dock with each other, or with a "target", like Gemini?
As for a space station (or Moon mission), doesn't that involve a new launcher (Long March 5 if I recall correctly is in the works)? If so will be powerful enough for a Moon mission? Space station, yes - but for the Moon, multiple launches to assembly a Moonship?

Chris.

Mr Meek
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Posts: 348
From: Chattanooga, TN
Registered: Dec 2007

posted 10-01-2008 08:05 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Mr Meek     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The Long March 5, despite the numerical coincidence, does not have the heavy lifting ability of even the Ares I*. So, it would most certainly require multiple launches of ~25,000 kg each to get a lander, earth departure stage, and crew capsule into LEO.

The only known rockets that could get an EDS, lander, and crew into orbit in one shot are sitting in museums. (Source)

*Projected, of course, for both.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27328
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 10-02-2008 06:59 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by cspg:
So rendezvous is next in the picture?
Rendezvous and docking: China's Shenzhou VIII, IX, X to Tiangong-1

cspg
Member

Posts: 4046
From: Geneva, Switzerland
Registered: May 2006

posted 10-03-2008 08:58 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for cspg   Click Here to Email cspg     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Mr Meek:
The Long March 5, despite the numerical coincidence, does not have the heavy lifting ability of even the Ares I*.
Do they have multiple launch pads?

And do you believe the "source" link you've provided? It states that Ariane 5 ECA has a 21,000kg to LEO but I've just read that such payload may be attributed to Ariane 5 next version, if approved, due to start 2016.

Chris.

Robert Pearlman
Editor

Posts: 27328
From: Houston, TX
Registered: Nov 1999

posted 10-05-2008 09:58 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
A couple of Shenzhou VII updates from Xinhua:

Rare herbal plants aboard Shenzhou-7 spacecraft studied

Several rare herbal plants aboard the recent Shenzhou-7 space mission have now been transferred to a Chinese nanobiotechnology lab for study.

The plants, including rauwolfia and salvia miltiorrhiza (also known as red sage), were used to produce nanomedicines to treat cancerous tumors, Professor Zhang Yangde with China's Laboratory of Nanobiotechnology at the Central South University told the Changsha Daily newspaper in Hunnan Province on Thursday.

Accompanying satellite begins orbiting Shenzhou-7 spaceship on Sunday

Chinese scientists on Sunday successfully directed the accompanying satellite BX-1 to begin circling the Shenzhou-7 spaceship, on an elliptical track of 4 kilometers multiplying 8 kilometers.

It is the first time that China has succeeded in maneuvering this kind of space orbiting, official sources say.

The accompanying satellite began orbiting the orbital capsule of the Shenzhou-7 at 18:14 pm, under the close monitoring and precise control of the Beijing Aerospace Control Center.

The BX-1 rode the Shenzhou-7 into the space on September 25 and it was launched by the spacecraft two days later. Since September 30, the control center changed its track six times to draw it closer to the space vehicle step by step, and finally it succeeded in orbiting the capsule.

Over the past days, the monitoring satellite has shot over 1,000 pictures of the spaceship from different angles. All the pictures are clear and complete, said an official with the space program.

The photos were condensed and stored after they were taken by the cameras installed on the satellite. The BX-1 shot its first photo six seconds after being released.

In one of the pictures published by the official, the spacecraft was flying like an eagle with the Earth as its background.

Philip
Member

Posts: 4803
From: Brussels, Belgium
Registered: Jan 2001

posted 11-22-2008 01:53 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Philip   Click Here to Email Philip     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Tracking the Chinese: Tracking Shenzhou 7 from Honolulu


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