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Author Topic:   Space related stamps?
Astro Bill
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posted 01-20-2007 10:47 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Astro Bill   Click Here to Email Astro Bill     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
What are space-related stamps?

The US Flash Gordon stamp, shown at the following link,
http://pic1.picturetrail.com/VOL1156/4194331/8777745/223867266.jpg

is included in some lists of "space-related" stamps. There is a close relationship between space, astronomy and science-fiction.

The US has issued two stamps featuring Superman. The latest, for DC Comics, is shown at the following link:
http://pic1.picturetrail.com/VOL1156/4194331/8777745/223867267.jpg

Should this be considered a "space-related" stamp?

Canada also issued a Superman stamp as shown at the following link:

this link.

[Edited by Astro Bill (January 22, 2007).]

RMH
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posted 01-21-2007 03:21 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for RMH   Click Here to Email RMH     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
In my view the super hero stamps don't relate to space. I collect space related stamps of the US but these definitely wont be in my collection. For me the definition of space related is that the stamp must have some connection to space and not just have a space element in the design (such as a moon.) I do look forward to this years release of the International Polar Year stamps showing the Auroras (these will be issued in 84 and 39 cent versions.) I am going to put these in the collection but I am not sure if I would consider these space related or not.

Astro Bill
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posted 01-21-2007 08:28 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Astro Bill   Click Here to Email Astro Bill     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I was referring to the new US Spperman stamp in particular, not the new "Super Heroes" in general. Superman came from another planet and he can travel in "space" (LEO). But I think you are right, the two US Superman stamps are probably not "spare-related" stamps.

The Space Unit website features over 1400 space and space-related stamps of the world. It also features 101 US space and space-related stamps at the following link:
http://stargate.1usa.com/stamps/stamps/usa/stampusa.htm

Included are the US stamps issued for the Mt. Palomar Observatory, Fort Bliss, the International Geophysical Year - IGY (during which Sputnik 1 was launched) Copernicus, Flash Gordon, and Star Trek, as well as the Earth "E" stamp, and the Express Mail/Priority Mail stamps showing an eagle and the Moon ("The Eagle has landed."). But that is all. Several stamps featuring space items were excluded, such as the Seattle "Space Needle" and the stamps featuring childrens' drawings of space.

Any of these 101 US space and space-related stamps are a great addition to space covers.

Robert Pearlman
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posted 01-21-2007 12:37 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I guess it comes down to how each person or organization defines "space" and "space-related".

For example, the Space Unit defines itself on its website as an "astrophilatelic society". Wikipedia in turn defines astrophilately as "the area of philately connected with human spaceflight." They in kind cite the International Federation of Philately (FIP) which expands the definition of astrophilately to include "historical events of Astronomy, Stratospheric Flights; Rocket Mail; Space Research Programmes; Manned Space flights; Telecommunication; and Space Exploration".

Under these definitions, stamps such as the Flash Gordon and Star Trek examples pictured on the Stamp Unit's website would not be included. If one were to follow Wikipedia's definition, stamps such as the Mt. Palomar Observatory, Copernicus and the those that just use space imagery for artistic reasons (i.e. the eagle and Moon definitives) would be further excluded.

The last time (to my knowledge) the USPS itself generated a list of their own space-themed stamps they appeared to adhere to the "human space exploration" history rule, omitting their astronomy- and sci-fi related issues.

This is the approach that I used for collectSPACE to generate our own guide to U.S. space stamps.

Part of the fun of collecting is seeing how others interpret the same topic in many different ways. Lists and guides such as the Stamp Unit's and our own can help a collector get started, but its ultimately their choice what fits and doesn't. Personally I wouldn't mix sci-fi (and fantasy) with reality within a space-topical collection, but others may feel differently.

Astro Bill
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posted 01-21-2007 03:32 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Astro Bill   Click Here to Email Astro Bill     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
The US has issued two sets of "space fantasy" stamps and they are both included in the list of space stamps and space-related stamps on the Space Unit website. It is for collectors to decide for themselves what to include in their collections. This thread was intended to address the recent US Superman stamp and whether it should be considered a space-related stamp.

I have always considered the Mt. Palomar stamp, Fort Bliss stamp, Copernicus stamp and IGY stamp to be space-related stamps for various reasons. I do not indend here to compare any list of space stamps to another list.

The Mt. Palomar stamp is included for the same reason that the Hubble Space Telescope images are included. The IGY stamp is included because this was the beginning of the space age when Sputnik 1 was launched. The USSR issued several IGY stamps. Some show rockets and some do not.

yeknom-ecaps
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posted 01-21-2007 04:24 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for yeknom-ecaps   Click Here to Email yeknom-ecaps     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by RMH:
I do look forward to this years release of the International Polar Year stamps showing the Auroras (these will be issued in 84 and 39 cent versions.) I am going to put these in the collection but I am not sure if I would consider these space related or not.

Auroras occur in "space" as they are generally 60 to 120 miles into the atmosphere. In addition there have been many rocket flights that have been launched to study Auroras with the latest being four rockets (2 Terrier-Orion and 2 Black Brants) launched from Poker Flat Research Range in Alaska a few days ago on January 19th for Clemson University.

[Edited by yeknom-ecaps (January 21, 2007).]

yeknom-ecaps
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posted 01-21-2007 04:33 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for yeknom-ecaps   Click Here to Email yeknom-ecaps     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Astro Bill:
The US has issued two stamps featuring Superman. The latest, for DC Comics, is shown here. Should this be considered a "space-related" stamp?[/b]
Personally I wouldn't consider the Superman stamps to be space related.

Interestingly, the catalog of space pictorial and slogan cancels created by the Pictorial-Eleven Society contained listings for the United States Superman pictorial cancels.

[Edited by yeknom-ecaps (January 21, 2007).]

Astro Bill
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posted 01-21-2007 04:35 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Astro Bill   Click Here to Email Astro Bill     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I agree that the IPY stamps should be considered space-related stamps. What about the Superman stamp?

Robert Pearlman
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posted 01-21-2007 05:00 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Astro Bill:
What about the Superman stamp?
If I am following your logic, why are you singling out Superman? What about Supergirl on the same stamp pane? Or for that matter, Green Lantern, who derives his power from a flame from space? Or Hawkman who is from the planet Thanagar? What about Batman, who travels to space with the Justice League? In fact, all the DC Comic super heroes travel to the League's space station in the more recent incarnations of their stories.

Given that comic books are pure fantasy, anything can happen with their characters and most, if not all, have some space-related story in their past (if not present). It would seem like a stretch to include any comic book characters within a space topical collection.

Astro Bill
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posted 01-22-2007 06:14 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Astro Bill   Click Here to Email Astro Bill     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Sri Lanka issued a pair of stamps a few years ago to honor Arthur C. Clarke, a space visionary and one of the most prolific science fiction writers. The stamps feature several satellites and they are undoubtedly IMHO space stamps. Clarke lives in Sri Lanka.

Science fiction writer and space visionary Willy Ley is featured on the cover of the recently-released Sep-Oct 2006 Astrophile as shown at the following link to the Space Unit website.
http://stargate.1usa.com/stamps/astrophile/2006-sep-oct.jpg

The new editor of the Astrophile apparently sees the relationship between spacephilately/ astrophilately and science fiction.

[Edited by Astro Bill (January 22, 2007).]

Robert Pearlman
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posted 01-22-2007 09:24 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Robert Pearlman   Click Here to Email Robert Pearlman     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Astro Bill:
The stamps feature several satellites...
Clarke is generally credited as the first with the idea for geostationary communication satellites, so this would be appropriate.
quote:
Science fiction writer and space visionary Willy Ley is featured on the cover...
Willy Ley was best known as a science writer whose works, to quote Wikipedia, "are regarded as classics of popular science and include The Conquest of Space (1949), The Conquest of the Moon (with Wernher von Braun and Fred Whipple, 1953), and Beyond the Solar System (1964)." His role in space exploration history is well established.

Ross
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posted 01-23-2007 07:38 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ross   Click Here to Email Ross     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
My opinion is that when looking at fantasy issues we need to look at the original show's (or comic etc) main theme. Although Superman came from another planet and occasionally flew into space, the comic/show was basicly Earth based. On the other hand, Flash Gordon was a space based comic. Therefore I would not include Superman as a Space related stamp.

My general approach with the SU web site is to be as general as is reasonably possible. Therefore I list fantasy stamps with an obvious Space theme, astronomy related stamps etc. I do draw the line at some issues such as Christmas stamps showing the star of Bethleham. An interesting example is Australia and the Southern Cross. The Southern Cross is on the Australian flag (as well as several others such as New Zealand) and is also a generally recognised symbol of Australia (at least in Australia). Therefore it appears on a number of Australian stamps. However, I don't count these as space related. An exception would be if it was shown as a constellation, say as a part of a series of such stamps.

There will always be differences of opinion and I hope with the SU Web site to cover the broadest reasonable range.

Ross.

Conrad
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posted 01-28-2007 05:51 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Conrad   Click Here to Email Conrad     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
In my exhibit, I have a frame titled 'The dreams and Fantasies of Space' in which the Superman/Supergirl stamps are shown (the action figures - not the comicbook covers), Flash Gordon, E.T., Star Trek, along with the 'Stampin The Future' set as well as the Space Discovery issue, the Futuristic Shuttle and the Future Mail Delivery s/s. THey are what they are titled - dreams and fantasies.

Also included earlier in the display is the JFK memorial stamp along with the 5/61 speech excerpt (although it was Johnson who pushed the space program). In that context, it is part of space just Copurnicus who pushed the church.

Conrad

icarkie
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posted 02-15-2007 07:34 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for icarkie   Click Here to Email icarkie     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
On the Astronomy side, Royal Mail has issued a cracking set of stamps on the 13th Feb.This is in honour of The Sky at Night Tv series.

( google the Sky at night stamps for the images ).
enjoy
Ian

Conrad
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posted 02-22-2007 07:05 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Conrad   Click Here to Email Conrad     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
By my own definition, "Space related stamps" can be anything that ties into space - whether or not that was the intention of the release. My FDC display includes the Copurnicus stamp (he did form one of the basic theories), Einstein (relativity is a very large part of space, John Kennedy (his May '61 speech challenged the world), I even begin the display with FDC's of the first US Rocket Mail local post covers from 1936 (Willy Ley wrote about rocket power in the '20's and helped in the design of the craft - the obvious tie-in).

Flash Gordon, Superman and Supergirl, E.T., Star Trek, are all in my display, because they are the imagination which is the beginning! Even the children's stamps about living in space. They are all as much a part of it as the end result.

Astro Bill
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posted 03-06-2007 05:04 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Astro Bill   Click Here to Email Astro Bill     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by yeknom-ecaps:
Auroras occur in "space" as they are generally 60 to 120 miles into the atmosphere. In addition there have been many rocket flights that have been launched to study Auroras with the latest being four rockets (2 Terrier-Orion and 2 Black Brants) launched from Poker Flat Research Range in Alaska a few days ago on January 19th for Clemson University.

On 21 March 2007 Russia will issue a set of stamps to note the Int'l Polar Year. They are shown at the following link with first day cover and cancellation:
http://home.nestor.minsk.by/fsunews/russia/2007/ru1400-2.html

They do not show any auroras, but they would look great next to the US IPY stamps.


[Edited by Astro Bill (March 06, 2007).]

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