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Forum:Space Shuttles - Space Station
Topic:Remote camera set up for a shuttle launch [video]
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contraGreat video. Thanks for pointing it out, James.
garymilgromThanks James. Is that you about 26 seconds in?
James BrownYes it is. I remember it being filmed.
Shuttle EndeavourI know this is an old topic, but I would like to maybe set a remote camera up for a launch someday. How do you keep the camera that close without the shockwave breaking the lens on the camera? Also, how do you have enough battery power throughout the countdown?
HeadshotWonderful video. Many thanks for posting it.
space4uGreat video. Thanks for posting James!
Jim Behling
quote:
Originally posted by Shuttle Endeavour:
How do you keep the camera that close without the shockwave breaking the lens on the camera? Also, how do you have enough battery power throughout the countdown?
There isn't a shock wave, it just a loud sound. If it would break the lens then any other structure near would not be standing or even the camera tripods.

There are separate electronics for the sound activation system and it wakes up the camera at the right time and sometimes power packs with extra batteries can be used.

James BrownMy cameras were plugged into sound triggers with built in timers. I would set what time I wanted the timer to turn everything on and off. The only time the camera was on, or batteries were being used, was during the time around launch. Since most launches only had a 10 minute window, it was easy to know when to set the timer.

I could also set mine for up to two weeks, so that if there was a 24 hour delay, everything would shut off until the launch time the following day, then wake everything up again.

As soon as the main engines cranked up, the sound would trigger the camera to shoot, and would continue shooting as long as the sound was there. Once the sound died down, the camera would stop shooting.

James BrownListen to the remote camera shooting pictures in this clip, once it clears the pad. A second camera shot this video. Chris Hetlage shot this video.

Shuttle EndeavourWow. Thanks for all the responses! Awesome video!
Shuttle EndeavourI am going to try recording the NROL-67 launch. I do have VIP launch viewing, but how can I get permission to place a camera at the pad? Thanks.
Robert PearlmanOnly badged press can set up remote cameras at the pad.
Shuttle EndeavourIs it possible to get press badging if you are a private photographer?
Robert PearlmanPress badging is only available to those actively working for an accredited media organization, either as an employee or freelance photographer.
capoetc
quote:
Originally posted by Shuttle Endeavour:
Is it possible to get press badging if you are a private photographer?
Start your own website!
BlackarrowWhat precisely causes the noise like an old steam locomotive labouring up an incline, shortly before main engine start?
Tom
quote:
Originally posted by Blackarrow:
What precisely causes the noise like an old steam locomotive labouring up an incline, shortly before main engine start?

Those are the APU's (Auxilary Power Units).

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